Privately owned trees

Did you know that almost 90% of the urban forest is located on private land in London? These 4.4 million trees have a structural value of $1.5 billion. They provide $17 million each year in ecosystem goods and services through energy conservation, cleaning the air and carbon sequestering.   

Apply for a permit

Tree permit application forms are linked below, or you can have one mailed to you.  To request an application form by mail, please contact Urban Forestry by emailing treeprotection@london.ca or by calling 519-661-5783, option 2.

Distinctive Tree Application

An application to injure and/or destroy Distinctive Tree(s) - meaning a tree with a trunk diameter of 50cm or greater, measured 1.4m above Natural Ground Level, that is located on a property within the Geographic area of the Urban Growth Boundary.

TPA - Individual Tree Application

An application to injure and/or destroy any tree(s) within a Tree Protection Area, which refers to any geographic area of the City that appears as a tree Protection Area on Schedule D of the Tree Protection By-law.

TPA - Cemetery or Golf Course Application

An application to Injure and/or Destroy any tree(s) within a Tree Protection Area which are Cemeteries or Golf Courses.  "Tree Protection Area" means any geographic area of the City that appears as a tree Protection Area on Schedule D of the Tree Protection By-law.

TPA - Forestry Management Application

An application to Injure and/or Destroy Tree(s), for Forestry Management, within a Tree Protection Area as defined by Schedule D of the Tree Protection By-law.

Tree protection

Extensive public consultation in 2012 showed that 86% of respondents supported tree protection. As a result, a by-law was enacted for protection of trees on private property.  In 2016 The Urban Forest Strategy was adopted with the main goal to reach 34% tree canopy cover by 2065, This goal can only be achieved by protecting  existing trees and planting many more new ones as soon as possible.

In 2015, our tree canopy was measured at 23.7%. A recent 2019 canopy cover study showed that the City’s urban forest has increased by an estimated 2.6% over the past 6 years and is now 26.8%.

Tree protection by-law

Removing trees on my property

The Tree Protection by-law applies to 2 types of trees and an approved permit is required prior to their removal and/or injury.

  1. Distinctive Trees, which are trees with a trunk diameter of 50 centimeters or greater, measured 1.4 metres above Natural Ground Level, that is located on property within the geographic area of the Urban Growth Boundary.
  2. Tree Protection Area (TPA) trees which are trees located in specially mapped areas. All trees, regardless of size, are protected in TPA.

Permits are still required to remove a dead or hazardous trees. If the City Planner accepts that the tree is dead or hazardous, there are no fees for the permit.

You do not need a permit to prune a tree as long as you use Good Arboriculture Practices. 

Use CityMap to interactively explore if your address is located in a Tree Protection Area. Enter the address in the blue "I want to ..." button to add the tree layer to the map.  More instructions on using the CityMap can be found below.

How to use CityMap

Use the Trees CityMap to interactively explore the inventory of trees in parks, on Thames Valley Golf Course and along boulevards and pathways on City land fronting homes and businesses. Once you've created your desired map view using the CityMap service and found an address or park, use the blue "I want to ..." button to add the tree layer to the map.  More instructions on using the CityMap can be found here.  Trees in the inventory are represented by green dots and you will be able to view the the following information for any tree in the inventory listing.  Trees have been located on the map as accurately as the technology allows.

  • Common name
  • Latin (scientific) name
  • Trunk diameter (centimetres)
  • Year observed
  • Inventory number (you may want to cross-reference this number if you are contacting the City of London's Forestry Operations Division about a concern or problem with a tree on municipal land)

 

 

Last modified:Monday, October 19, 2020