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Copyright © 2001

Site Plan Control By-law - C.P.-1455-541

By-Law Number
C.P.-1455-541

OFFICE CONSOLIDATION INCLUDING AMENDMENT C.P.-1455(p)-319 (November 26, 2019)

A by-law to designate a site plan control area and to delegate Council's power under Section 41 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.P.13.

WHEREAS Section 41 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.P.13 provides in part that, where in an official plan an area is shown or described as a proposed site plan control area, the council of the local municipality in which the proposed area is situate may, by by-law, designate the whole or any part of such area as a site plan control area and may delegate to either a committee of the council or to an appointed officer of the municipality any of the council's power or authority under that section;

AND WHEREAS Clause 5(2)(b) of the Building Code Act authorizes the council of a municipality to pass by-laws requiring applications for building construction permits to be accompanied by such plans, specifications, documents and other information as is prescribed;

AND WHEREAS in the Official Plan for the City of London Planning Area the whole of the City of London is shown or described as a proposed site plan control area and the Council of The Corporation of the City of London considers if appropriate to designate the whole of the City of London as a site plan control area, to delegate its powers or authority under Section 41 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.P.13, to certain appointed officials of the Corporation, and to require applications for building construction permits to be accompanied by plans and drawings referred to in Subsection 41(4) and by one or more agreements with the Corporation that deal with or ensure the provision and maintenance of any of the facilities, works or matters to be provided in conjunction with all buildings and structures to be erected and any of the facilities, works or matters mentioned in Subsection 41(7) of that Act.

THEREFORE the Municipal Council of The Corporation of the City of London enacts as follows:

SITE PLAN CONTROL AREA BY-LAW

INTERPRETATION

Definitions

1. In this by-law, unless a contrary intention appears,

(a) "Act" means the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, c.P. 13;

(b) "Corporation" means The Corporation of the City of London;

(c) "Council" means the municipal council of the Corporation;

(d) "delegated official" means any of the appointed officers of the Corporation identified in Schedule 3 to this by-law either by name or position occupied;

(e) "development" means

(i) the construction, erection or placing of one or more buildings or structures on land; or

(ii) the making of an addition or alternation to a building or structure that has the effect of substantially increasing the size or usability thereof; or

(iii) the laying out and establishment of a commercial parking lot or of sites for the location of three or more trailers or of sites for the location of three or more mobile homes; or

iv) sites for the construction, erection or location of three or more land lease community homes;

and includes redevelopment;

(f) “Development Agreement” means an agreement entered into between the Corporation and the Owner outlining the terms and conditions of the development and the approved plans and drawings as provided under Section 41(7)(c) of the Planning Act RSO 1990;

(g) "mobile home" means any dwelling that is designed to be made mobile, and constructed or manufactured to provide a permanent residence for one or more persons, but does not include a travel trailer or tent trailer or trailer otherwise designed;

(h) "Official Plan" means the Official Plan for the City of London Planning Area as amended from time to time;

(i) “Owner” means the person appearing as the registered Owner according to the records of the proper land registry office or a person in the actual occupation of land sold to the Director in accordance with the Veterans’ Land Act (Canada) shall also be deemed to be the Owner;

(j) "security policy" means the policy regarding subdivision security and development agreement security adopted by resolution of Council on November 2, 1981, as amended from time to time, or any successor of that policy;

(k) "Site Plan Design Manual" means Schedule 1 to this by-law; and

(l) "trailer" means any vehicle so constructed that it is suitable for being attached to a motor vehicle for the purpose of being drawn or propelled by the motor vehicle, and capable of being used for the living, sleeping or eating accommodation of persons, notwithstanding that such vehicle is jacked-up or that its running gear is removed.

Site Plan Design Manual

2. (1) The Site Plan Design Manual is attached as Schedule 1 and forms part of this by-law.

Metric

3. Wherever Metric measure is used in the Design Manual, the inclusion in parenthesis of Imperial measure is for convenience only and, in the event of any discrepancy between the Metric measure and the corresponding Imperial measure, the Metric measure applies.

DEVELOPMENT SUBJECT TO SITE PLAN APPROVAL

Site Plan Control Area

4. The whole of the City of London as constituted from time to time is hereby designated as a site plan control area.

Exempt Classes of Development

5. The following classes of development may be undertaken without the approval of plans and drawings otherwise required under Subsection 41(4) or (5) of the Act, and this by-law does not apply to such classes:

  1. A building or structure which is constructed, erected or placed on a freehold lot for the purpose of a single detached dwelling unit or a semi- detached dwelling unit or a duplex dwelling, except a single sideyard dwelling unit and except where the approval of plans or drawings is required as a condition of provisional consent or a condition of a Minor Variance decision or otherwise required by the Official Plan.
  2.  An addition or alteration to a building or structure mentioned in Clause (a) except a single side yard dwelling unit and except where the approval of plans or drawings is required as a condition of provisional consent or a condition of a Minor Variance decision or otherwise required by the Official Plan.
  3.  Agricultural and farm related buildings, building additions, building alterations or structures that are utilized in farming operations but not including agricultural-commercial or industrial operations such as farm equipment sales and service, farm supply sales and agricultural storage, service or supply establishments.
  4.  Sand and gravel pits located in the City. Provision and Maintenance of Facilities, etc.

6. As a condition to the approval of the plans and drawings referred to in subsection 41(4) of the Act, the Owner of the land shall hereby:

  1. provide at no expense to the Corporation the facilities, works or matters mentioned in clause 41(7)(a) of the Act approved in accordance with Section 41 of the Act and shown on the approved plans and drawings and in the development agreement; and
  2.  maintain at the sole risk and expense of the Owner the facilities or works mentioned in paragraphs 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 of clause 41(7)(a) of the Act and shown on the approved plans and drawings and in the development agreement, approved in accordance with Section 41 of the Act, including the removal of snow from access ramps and driveways, parking and loading areas and walkways.

APPROVAL OF PLANS AND DRAWINGS

Application for Approval

7. Every site plan application shall be accompanied by the following plans, specifications, documents and information:

  1.  the plans referred to in Paragraph 1 of Subsection 41(4) of the Act, showing all facilities and works to be provided in conjunction with the building or structure and all the facilities, works and matters referred to in Clause 41(7)(a) of the Act in accordance with Schedule 1, Site Plan Design Manual submission requirements;
  2.  the drawings referred to in Paragraph 2 of Subsection 41(4) of the Act in accordance with Schedule 1, Site Plan Design Manual submission requirements;
  3.  where required under clause 9(b) of this by-law one or more agreements with the Corporation in the form in Schedule 2 to this by-law dealing with the provision and maintenance of the facilities and works to be provided in conjunction with the building or structure and the facilities, works and matters mentioned in Subsection 41(7) of the Act in accordance with the plans and drawings approved pursuant to the Act and this by-law and in accordance with Schedule 1, Site Plan Design Manual submission requirements;
  4. where required under an agreement referred to in clause (c) cash or an irrevocable letter of credit in favour of the Corporation in accordance with schedule 1 council's security policy to protect the Corporation in respect of its liability for holdback and costs under Subsection 17(4) of the Construction Lien Act, 1990 and to assure satisfactory provision and maintenance of the facilities and works to be provided in conjunction with the building or structure and the facilities, works and matters mentioned in Subsection 41(7) of the Act in accordance with the plans and drawings approved pursuant to the Act and this by-law and in accordance with Schedule 1, Site Plan Design Manual submission requirements; and
  5.  all reports and studies required on the record of consultation.

8. (1) Subject to Section 9 schedule 3 of this by-law, all of the Council's powers or authority under Section 41 of the Act, except the authority to define any class or classes of development as mentioned in Clause 41(13)(a) of the Act, are hereby delegated to and may be exercised by one or more of the appointed officers of the Corporation identified in Schedule 3 to this by-law either by name or position occupied.

(2) The Council hereby appoints each appointed officer to be appointed officers to sign and deliver, together with another one of the appointed officers, for and in the name and behalf of the Corporation agreements in the form in Schedule 2 to this by-law, and such agreements shall be binding upon the Corporation without any further authorization or formality.

Exercise of Power

9. The exercise of the powers, authority or appointment delegated or made under Section 8 of this by-law is subject to the following:

  1.  An appointed officer shall approve the plans and drawings referred to in Subsection (41)(4) of the Act except where,
    1. the proposed facilities, works or matters shown on the plans and drawings are not consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement, are not consistent with the policies of the Official Plan and other Council approved policy, do not comply with the zoning by-law and any other applicable by- law.
    2.  where submission requirements of the application under Section 7 of this by-law are incomplete.
  2. As a condition to the approval of plans and drawings referred to in Subsection 41(4) of the Act, the appointed officer may require that the Owner of the land enter into one or more agreements referred to in Paragraph (7)(c) of this by-law.
  3.  The powers or authority under Clauses 41(7)(b) and (c) of the Act with respect to any of the facilities, works or matters mentioned in Paragraphs 1, 2, 3, 7, 8 and 9 of Clause 41(7)(a) of the Act shall be exercised by an appointed officer on the advice of the City Engineer or his delegate.
  4.  The provisions of the Site Plan Design Manual shall be applied in each circumstance as it arises with such variations or modifications as the circumstances may require so long as each applicable provision is given effect according to its true intent and purpose.
  5. The form or wording of the agreement in Schedule 2 shall be used with such variations or modifications as circumstances may require so long as the substance is not changed or affected and any variance from Schedule 2, not being in manner or substance, does not affect the regularity of any agreement. In addition to this, other clauses may be added as required by the appointed officer.
  6.  
    1.  At the time of considering a zoning or rezoning of a property or properties, the Built and Natural Environment Committee may as part of their recommendation to City Council require that a site plan public meeting be held to receive comments regarding the site plan, building elevations, landscape plan and any requirements of the development agreement by placing a holding provision with the proposed zone without further notice or by adding a direction for staff to hold a public meeting at Built and Natural Environment Committee and based on the one or more public meetings Council should advise the appointed officer of any items to consider in their reviews as raised by the public and/or as advised by Council; or
    2.  In some cases, Official Plan Policies may require a site plan public meeting. In these cases the appointed officers will request that the Built and Natural Environment Committee convene a public meeting on behalf of the appointed officers to obtain input from the public and receive advice from Council and subsequently report to the appointed officers the results of the public meeting and any comments of Council; or
    3. When, in connection with a specific application, City Council passes a by-law to revoke the powers under Section 8 of this By-law, a public site plan meeting shall be convened by the Built and Natural Environment committee and the Owner shall be afforded an opportunity to be heard at a public meeting of the Built and Natural Environment Committee, for the purpose of considering the plans and drawings and requirements pertaining to the development. The Built and Natural Environment Committee shall provide a recommendation to Council concerning the approval of the plans and drawings pertaining to the development and any requirements under Subsection 41(7) of the Act, including the provision of any agreement required; or
    4. (iv) In any case where development has been the subject of a public site plan meeting and that development does not proceed, a further public site plan meeting will be required when a new site plan application is made for the same lands. In cases where an application is made to make minor amendments in keeping the general intent of the plans approved by Council, the appointed officers may approve these changes and may add any additional clauses to the agreement without the need for a further public site plan meeting except as otherwise directed by Council.

Executive Acts Authorized

10. The Mayor and City Clerk are hereby authorized to execute on behalf and under the seal of the Corporation any document necessary to give further effect to the provisions of this by-law, when the appointed officers’ authority has been revoked.

ENFORCEMENT

Conflict of Laws

11. In the event of conflict between the provisions of the Site Plan Design Manual and any applicable zoning by-law or federal or provincial statute or regulation, the provisions of the zoning by-law, statue or regulation shall apply.

Development Without Approved Plans

12. Every person who, without having plans or drawings approved in accordance with Section 41 of the Act, undertakes any development in the site plan control area designated by this by-law is pursuant to Section 67 of the Act, guilty of contravening Section 41 of the Act.

Failure To Provide or Maintain Facilities, etc.

13. Every person who undertakes any development in the site plan control area designated by this by-law without providing or maintaining any of the facilities, works or matters that are mentioned in Clause 41(7)(a) of the Act and that are required by the Corporation under that clause as a condition to the approval of plans or drawings in accordance with Section 41 is, pursuant to Section 67 of the Act, guilty of contravening Section 41 of the Act.

Failure To Enter Into Agreement

14. Every person who undertakes any development in the site plan control area designated by this by-law without entering into one or more agreements with the Corporation that deal with or ensure the provision or maintenance of any of the facilities, works or matters and that the person is required by the Corporation to enter into under that subsection as a condition to the approval of plans and drawings in accordance with Section 41 is, pursuant to Section 67 of the Act, guilty of contravening Section 41 of the Act.

Penalty Upon Conviction

15. Every person who is convicted of an offence under Section 41 of the Act is liable to fine or penalty prescribed by Section 67 of the Act.

Thomas C. Gosnell

Deputy Mayor

Kevin Bain

City Clerk

First Reading – June 26, 2006

Second Reading – June 26, 2006

Third Reading - June 26, 2006

Schedule 1

Table of Contents

1. Submission Requirements.

2. Location of Buildings and Facilities

3. External Facilities and Works in conjunction with the Site

4. Road Widening

5. Access to and from Site

6. Parking Facilities and Internal Driveway

7. Walkways and all other means of Pedestrian Access

8. Facilities for Lighting including Floodlighting

9. Landscaping and Buffering of the Site

10. Facilities and Enclosures for the Storage of Garbage and Recycling

11. Easements

12. Grading and disposal of Storm, Surface and Wastewater

13. Tree Preservation

14. Bicycle Facilities

15. Water Servicing

Schedule 2 – Development Agreement Clauses

Schedule 3 – List of appointed Officers”

1. SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS to By-law, CP-1455-541 Site Plan Design Manual

a. Introduction

Site plan drawings accompanying an application for site plan approval are required to demonstrate how a proposal meets the various aspects of the Official Plan Policies, the Zoning By-law and the City's Site Plan Control Area By-law.

All the information may be presented on one drawing provided the information is clearly legible and accurate. On more complex proposals it may be necessary to prepare separate drawings to illustrate each aspect more clearly, e.g. existing conditions, site plan, landscape plan site servicing plan, building elevations and a legal plan.

All projects require a site plan drawn to scale on a manageable sheet size. A plan of topographical survey of the job, if available, will assist in the assessment of the project. Building elevations are also required and in some cases, cross-section drawings and an Urban Design Brief are also required. The following sections outline the submission requirements for each submission point in the Site Plan Approval process. Incomplete submissions will not be received for processing. Where possible all submissions should be made in hard copy and electronic (.pdf) formats.

1.2. Request for Consultation Package

The Request for Consultation summarizes the Applicant’s concept plan and assumptions for developing their site. Submission of a Site Plan Request for Consultation constitutes the Applicant’s formal request to initiate Mandatory Consultation as required under the City’s Planning Pre-consultation By-law, C.P. 1469-217. A Request for consultation Package includes:

  1.  Supporting Information Cover Document including the completion of the Site Plan Request for Consultation form
    1. 1. Description of the proposed site;
    2. 2. Written report of the context within the existing neighbourhood and the current Official Plan policy, including a map to contextualize the site/layout with the neighbourhood;
    3. 3. Intention and objectives of the proposed site plan; and
    4. 4. Servicing assumptions for the site.
  2.  Concept Site Plan Drawings: All packages require a dimensioned plan illustrating the proposed concept for development of the site and showing key existing and proposed site features on the face of the plan such as location of buildings, significant vegetation, access, etc.:
  • Dimensioned plan illustrating the proposed site.
  •  Location of exiting and proposed buildings on the site.
  •  Significant trees and natural vegetation.
  •  Hard and soft Landscaping
  •  Pedestrian and vehicular access to/from the site
  •  Location and nature of vehicle/bicycle parking
  •  Loading/service/garbage areas
  •  Sign location(s)
  •  Principal pedestrian entrance, barrier free entrance and fire fighters’ entrance
  •  Fencing (location & type)
  •  Easements, comments on the property

c.    Concept Elevations: The request package shall include concept elevations for each view of the proposed development (Depending upon the type and scale of the proposed development) concept elevations may take the form of either drafted plans, doctored photos or illustrated examples. Detailed elevations are not required at this stage but the provided concepts should adequately convey the proposed built form and appearance of the development and include items such as:

  •  Facades labelled according to the direction they face
  •  Indicate facade materials to be used
  •  Identify major pedestrian entrances
  •  Indicate Base, Middle, Cap of the structure(s)
  •  Roof type
  •  Sign location(s)
  •  Vision (transparent) glass location(s)
  •  Existing condition plan as per Section 1.4 of Schedule “I”
  •  Context with nearby buildings

REQUIREMENTS PLANS AT THE APPLICATION STAGE

The following plans are required for Site Plan Approval

1.3. Legal Plan Requirements

The Legal plan (if required) should show the following:

  1.  plans in blackline only, 56 cm x 82 cm maximum (22" x 32"), of development site, including a calculation of its area, certified by an Ontario Land Surveyor;
  2.  title, location of project, date, of the survey;
  3.  north point and scale (graphic bar scale as well as written ratio scale); and
  4.  bearings and distance of all property lines, and dimensions and location of all existing buildings and structures.

1.4. Existing Conditions Plan Requirements

The existing conditions plan should show the following:

  1.  dimensions and locations of all existing buildings or structures, fences, access driveways, fire hydrants and utility poles;
  2.  existing site constraints, such as adjacent streets (showing curbs, gutters, ditches, etc.), sidewalks, rights of way and easements;
  3.  the location, elevation, size and species of:
    1.  trees exceeding 100 mm (4 inches) diameter at breast height;
    2.  trees and shrubs exceeding 1.5 metres (5 feet) in height located:
      •  on a property line of the proposed development
      • on the proposed development and within 6 metres (19.6 feet) of a property line including a property line common to a public street
      • on lands adjacent to the proposed development and within 3.0 metres (10 feet) of the common property line;
    3.  trees and shrubs on the boulevard of the public street along the streetline(s) of the proposed development; and
    4.  wetlands, ESA(s), woodlands and Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest
  4.  existing location and/or distance of the nearest transit stop from the limits of the property;
  5.  existing location and/or distance of the nearest transit stop from the limits of the property;
  6.  existing uses on abutting properties;
  7.  existing contours; existing servicing;
  8.  existing easements or restrictive covenants.

1.5. Site Plan Requirements (see Figure 9.2 for Example)

The site plan requirements are as follows:

  1.  plans submitted to be in blackline only, no greater than 56 cm x 82 cm (22" x 32") (for reduction purposes) folded to 22 cm x 28 cm or 36 cm (8 1/2" x 11" or 14");
  2.  key map - scale 1:2,000 outline of the development site with sufficient amount of surrounding area to indicate its general location, with major adjacent features, such as parks, bus routes, etc. (base map is available from the City);
  3.  title, location (plan and lot number) and date;
  4.  north point and metric scale [preferably 1:500 (1" = 40') or 1:250 (1" = 20') graphic bar scale, as well as a written ratio scale];
  5.  centre line and curb line of adjacent streets, sidewalks and existing street line; required dedication for street widening purposes and future road widening in accordance with adopted Council standards in the Official Plan and the Zoning By-law (all dimensions should be included on the drawing);
  6.  if the site is adjacent to a river or large watercourse, the site plan drawing should show the location of the surface water at normal flows, the floodplain boundary, if it has been established by the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority, contours of the valley and the banks at not more than 1.5 m (5 feet) intervals and the dedication line;
  7. clear indication of subject property’s boundary being the same as the legal plan (dimensions and area calculations);
  8. approximate location and height of buildings on adjacent sites;
  9. adjacent property owned or controlled by the applicant;
  10.  locations, height and dimensions [distances between buildings and yard dimensions (front yard, side yard, rear yard)] of all buildings and other structures proposed on the site;
  11.  a "site data" schedule as illustrated in Table 1.1 for residential uses, industrial, institutional and Table 1.2 for commercial uses;
  12.  location and height of external lighting fixtures;
  13.  garbage storage (type and location) and collection areas;
  14.  loading and on site vehicular circulation areas, indicated widths and proposed direction of traffic flows as well as proposed ramps or access driveways;
  15.  proposed parking areas or structures; number of spaces, dimensions of parking spaces, aisles and driveways, location of pedestrian and vehicular building entrances, and area to be devoted to each proposed use;
  16.  proposed snow storage areas
  17. landscaped areas;
  18. where there is a major change in existing topography, existing and proposed grades at key points, such as building corners, tops and bottoms of proposed slopes, walls, curbs and steps;
  19.  location and height of free-standing signs;
  20.  location of walkways and bicycle ways including surface treatment; and
  21.  identification of transit routes abutting or adjacent to a proposed development site, and the location and/or distance from the limits of the site to the nearest transit stops.

1.6. Landscape Plan Requirements

1.6.1 Landscape Planting Plan (See Figure 9.1 for Example) The base plan for the landscape plan should be the same as the site plan. The landscape plans should be in blackline only, 56 cm x 82 cm (22" x 32"), and should include:

  1.  location by symbol of all existing trees (to be preserved) and proposed trees and shrubs (the symbol should reflect the branch spread or canopy of existing trees and shrubs, and the proposed trees and shrubs at maturity):
  2.  a list of all species, including common name, botanical name, quantity, size and condition at planting (see Table 9.4);
  3.  planting specifications including sodding (see Table 9.6);
  4. cross-section to show detailed tree and potted shrub planting methods (see Figure 9.3); and
  5.  the landscape plan should include the professional endorsement (stamp) of a landscape architect or equivalent where warranted.

1.6.2 Tree Preservation Plan

Trees and shrubs proposed for preservation and preservation measures can be incorporated on the Landscape Planting Plan or shown on a separate Tree Preservation Plan. Separate Tree Preservation Plans should:

  1.  be at the same scale as other site plans and preferably superimposed upon the Site Servicing Plan;
  2.  accurate location of existing vegetation;
  3.  existing and proposed grade elevations;
  4. building(s), site facilities including parking areas, driveways, service areas, pedestrian walkways, and underground and overhead services; and
  5.  limits of construction/ground disturbance.

1.7. Site Servicing Plan Requirements

The site servicing plan should be prepared by a registered Professional Engineer in Ontario and the plans shall be stamped and signed. This should include:

1.7.1. Sanitary Sewer Systems

(a) drainage piping - location, from building to private drain connections, size and grade;

(b) private drain connections - existing and new, location, size and grade;

(c) control manholes (if required, see Section 12.6), to be located at the street line on private property;

(d) all manholes to show invert and finish grade elevations; and

(e) The design of “private” sewer and water are to conform to the requirements set out in the Ontario Building Code. In some cases, these systems may require a Certificate of Approval by the Ministry of Environment.

1.7.2 Storm Drainage Systems and Grading Plans

(a) catch basins - locations, proposed elevations for grates, and inverts;

(b) all manholes to show invert and finish grade elevations;

(c) drainage piping - location, size, grade (slope);

(d) private drain connections - existing and new, location, size and grade;

(e) drainage swales (landscaped areas) - elevations along swale, cross sections % grade (slope);

(f) overland flow - show flow arrows to permit ready identification of overland flow direction, show existing and proposed elevations along property lines, and key points on site and abutting properties;

(g) flows from adjacent properties - in the event that adjacent private properties drain onto the site being developed, the storm drainage system is to be designed to prevent storm water from backing up and creating a flooding or ponding condition on the adjacent property;

(h) weeping tiles - where weeping tiles are to be installed show how the flows will be handled to comply with Section 12.1;

(i) dry-well systems, infiltration systems and storm retention systems - the site services plan is to display such relevant detail contained in the consulting engineer's design as will be necessary to insure that all design features are implemented by the contractor (see Sections 12.3 and 12.4); and

(j) the site shall be designed to the standards and specifications of the City and any alternative designs, enhanced operational requirements shall be approved by the City Engineer.

1.7.3 Water Systems

a) show size and location of watermain, valves, fire hydrants, siamese connections, chambers, water meter location(s), etc.;

b) existing services and service box chambers;

c) watermain and water service design to City of London specifications and Ministry of the Environment requirements;

d) Where the Ontario Building Code does not specify, the City of London’s specifications shall take precedence for all watermain and services;

e) All watermain and services above 100 mm diameter and larger shall be swabbed, chlorinated, and tested in accordance with applicable standards and requirements.

1.8. Building Elevations and Cross-Section Drawings Requirements (Fig. 1.1)

The following must be submitted:

  1.  the drawings submitted to be in blackline, no greater than 56 cm x 82 cm (22" x 32") - it is preferred that this drawing be included on the site plan drawing;
  2.  scale 1:200 (1" = 16') or 1:100 (1" = 10') as appropriate;
  3.  elevations of all facades of the buildings and front facade of any buildings on adjacent property;
  4.  the elevations should show all windows, doors, other openings, and any mechanical equipment on the roof. The habitable and non- habitable room windows of dwelling units should be identified on the drawing. Signs and graphics should also be shown;
  5.  Indicate the type, colour and texture of materials;
  6.  a longitudinal cross-section view through the building to the street line, including all parking structures, should be shown - where parking structures are included, a cross-section should be taken along the driveway providing access to the street showing the slope of the ramps (see Figure 6.2 for standards); and
  7.  the elevation of any sign structure should be shown. (Sizes of signs are regulated under the Sign and Canopy By-law).

Table 1.1: Residential Site Data

Gross Site Area m2  ha
Net Site Area (-road allowance dedication) m2  ha

Number of Units:

Single Family

Semi-Detached

Townhouse

Apartments

 

Number of Units by Bedroom Count:

Bachelor

1 Bedroom

2 Bedroom

3 Bedroom

4 Bedroom

5 or more Bedrooms

 
Height m
Density units per net hectare
Building Area m2 
Building Coverage %
Landscaped Open Space m2   %*
Common Open Space m2   %*
Parking Spaces Provided

Ratio space per : Spaces Required

Parking Rates Used  
Visitor Parking  
Barrier Free Parking  

Table 1.2: Commercial  Design Data

 

Gross Site Area m2  ha
Net Site Area (-road allowance dedication) m2  ha

Gross Floor Area

m2 

Gross Leasable Floor Area

m2 
Number of Floors  
Floor Area Ratio * :
Coverage %
Height m
Landscaped Open Space m2   %*
Common Open Space m2   %*
Parking Spaces Provided

 

Parking Ratio Used

Ratio space per : Spaces Required

FIGURE 1.1: SAMPLE BUILDING ELEVATIONS

Image
 Building elevations and cross-section drawing example. This example is of the front of the building and back of the building.

2. LOCATION OF BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

2.1. Objective

To demonstrate the extent to which the massing and conceptual design of new developments is designed to:

  1.  provide a comfortable and pleasing environment for the intended uses in terms of buildings orientation, form and siting;
  2. be consistent with or complimentary to existing buildings that are to be retained; and
  3.  be consistent with or complimentary to existing street scapes.
  4.  To provide bird-friendly design of a site for:
    1.  conservation of resident and migratory bird species
    2.  reduced mortality from bird-building collisions
    3. reduced negative impacts on natural heritage

(See Official Plan Policies 11.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.2.3, 3.2.4, 3.2.5, 3.6.4, 3.6.7, 3.6.8, 3.6.9, 4.1.2, 4.1.3, 4.1.4, 4.1.5, 4.5.4, 4.6.4, 5.4.2, 6.3, 7.2.5, 7.2.7, 7.3.5, 7.4.5 and applicable zoning by-laws). 

(All references to the O.P. are from the January 1, 2005 consolidation)

2.2. Definitions

(a) Barrier Free – Barrier Free means, when applied to a building and its facilities, that the building and its facilities can be approached, entered and used by persons with physical or sensory disabilities.

(b) Facade - Refers to an individual wall of a building and its treatment; e.g. the street facade is the wall which faces the street.

(c) Floor Area, Gross - The sum of the horizontal areas of the floor of a building, that are at or above finished grade level, measured between the exterior faces of the exterior walls or from the centre line of any common or party wall, but excluding any attic, private garage, breeze way, porch, veranda, balcony or similar appurtenant structure.

(d) Floor Area, Gross Leasable - Defined as the gross floor area designed for tenant occupancy and exclusive use, including basements, mezzanines, upper storey areas, and integral storage areas expressed in square metres measured from the centre lines of joining partitions and exteriors of outside walls, and does not include public or common areas including malls, corridors, stairways, elevators, washrooms, or machine and equipment rooms.

(e) Habitable Room - Any room or space intended primarily for human occupancy such as kitchens, living rooms, family rooms, dens, recreation room, and bedrooms.

(f) Heritage Building - One which has been designated under the Ontario Heritage Act.

(g) Modulation - With respect to built form, refers to the rhythm of changes in the surface treatment of a wall, facade or other building surface, e.g. modulating a wall with protruding forms and recessed areas, modulating a facade with brick, wood, etc.

(h) Podium - A platform constituting an artificial grade above levels of parking or non-residential uses.

(i) Point Tower - A high profile building form, generally square in plan with windows on all sides and more slender than a traditional slab- like building.

(j) Profile, Low - Refers to the height of buildings lower than 4 storeys.

(k) Profile, Medium - Refers to the height of building from 4 to 7 storeys in height.

(l) Profile, High - Refers to the height of buildings 8 storeys or more.

(m) Separation Space - Open space around residential buildings separating them from adjacent activities and to ensure an appropriate environment for the intended use.

(n) Setback - The least horizontal distance measured perpendicular from a building to a property or street line.

(o) Slab Building - Generally a high or medium profile building with a rectangular shape and one dimension exceeds two times the other.

(p) Street Line - The limit of the road or street allowance.

(q) Storey - That portion of a building, other than an attic or a cellar, included between any floor level and the floor, ceiling or roof next above it.

(r) Transit Route - means an established public road upon which the London Transit Commission operates a scheduled bus service. Transit route also means all roads shown as arterial and primary collector roads in the City of London Official Plan.

(s) Transit Passenger Amenities - means facilities for the comfort and convenience of transit passengers including shelters, hard surface areas, benches, night lighting, transit information signs, kiosks and bicycle storage facilities.

(t) Transit Route on Private Property - means facilities for the movement of buses from the municipal road system across private property and returning to the municipal road system and includes internal driveways, curbs, landscaped islands, signs, pavement markings and night lighting.

2.3. Orientation

2.3.1. General

(a) Consideration should be given to locating residential buildings close to the north lot line to increase solar access to open spaces in the site. However, the proposed building(s) should not excessively shade adjacent private or public property.

(b) Where possible existing public view into, through and out of a development site should be maintained and improved. Community identity can be achieved by making such public view more evident or interesting, i.e. to give access to vantage points and maintain view of:

  • churches;
  • heritage buildings;
  •  bodies of water;
  •  distant hills;
  •  open spaces;
  • bridges.

(c) Buildings should where possible reinforce the prevailing street pattern by aligning with the established building line or street edge. Buildings may be set back from or placed at an angle to the existing street edge if they are of community importance. Where buildings do not align with the street edge, the landscaping or site features should define the transition to a new axis while maintaining the alignment with the street edge.

(d) New development next to parks, open space, streets and plazas should create and effective edge to help enclose and define the spatial boundaries at an appropriate scale.

(e) Where development is proposed on a property that abuts a transit route, buildings are encouraged in locations as close to the streetline as possible with direct, convenient and barrier free access from City sidewalks to the building entrance(s) in a manner to reduce walking distances to and from transit stops.

2.3.2. Residential

(a) The long axis of apartment buildings should be oriented north and south or northeast and southwest where feasible, to ensure that most of the dwelling units will receive sunlight during some part of the day.

(b) The long axis of residential building with openings on opposite sides should be oriented east and west to the greatest possible extent.

(c) Residential buildings exceeding 4 storeys should be sited with one of the longest walls parallel to and not more than 6 m (20 feet) from a driveway which can accommodate fire equipment.

2.4. Form

(a) New buildings, in particular high profile buildings, should recognize the possible adverse effect of wind at ground level by:

  1.  avoiding large flat surfaces prevailing westerly winds;
  2.  avoiding building massing which causes the funnelling of prevailing winds; and
  3. protecting building faces of lower floors for protection of external pedestrian circulation immediate to the building(s).

(b) For buildings over 3 storeys, consideration should be given to setting back the upper storeys to reduce any overpowering or overshadowing affects on streets, other public open spaces or adjacent properties. Slab buildings should be broken down into smaller elements usually by:

  1.  varying the facade;
  2.  pierce it periodically at key points to form entrances and egress passageways from one space to another;
  3.  design the detailed architectural treatment of the facade to provide visual divisions; and
  4.  use foliage to compliment the facade.

(c) The lower floors of a building, whether high or low profile, should reflect the scale of the pedestrian environment and/or the existing neighbourhood pattern. New development should be of such a scale and character that it will not be considered a "project" isolated and set apart from an existing neighbourhood. Patterns to be respected include:

  1.  predominant building height at the street;
  2.  ground level treatments;
  3.  ground level views;
  4.  roof treatments;
  5.  frontage widths;
  6.  continuity of street face;
  7.  articulation of facades;
  8.  scale of doors, windows and other openings;
  9.  canopies;
  10.  lighting;
  11.  landscaping; and
  12.  orientation toward street, including pedestrian and transit passenger amenities.

(d) The form created by the building should produce a sense of physical security by controlling ingress and egress and by providing for visual surveillance of all public or common areas.

(e) The form of new structures immediately adjacent to heritage buildings should respecting existing patterns and details such as:

  1.  height;
  2.  rhythm of buildings on street;
  3.  roof slopes and shapes; and
  4.  rhythm and proportion of building openings.

The developer shall also be encouraged to consider the following:

  1.  compatibility of materials, textures and colours;
  2. unique architectural details: cornices, railing, lintels, arches, ironwork, chimneys, etc.; and
  3.  understating architectural detail rather than duplicate.

(f) Developers are encouraged and, depending on the type of buildings, may be required under the Ontario Building Code to incorporate design features that will accommodate senior citizens and persons with disabilities. Reference should be made to the Ontario Building code for hose buildings which are required by law to provide facilities for the person with disabilities.

2.5. Multi-Family Residential Setbacks and Separation Spaces

Separation spaces generally refers to the space between buildings on the same site. Setback generally refers to the space between a building and the street line or property line and thereby determines the spaces between buildings on the site and adjacent properties. If balconies are included in the design, setbacks and separation spaces are measured from this face. Separation is also required for fire protection under the Ontario Building Code.

The objectives or providing distances between buildings are as follows:

  1. Daylight/Sunlight - Space should be provided around dwellings to ensure the provision of daylight. It is also desirable to provide for direct sunlight to habitable areas of each dwelling unit, if possible, throughout the year. New housing should be located so as not to unduly deprive existing dwellings and private outdoor spaces in the surrounding areas of adequate sunlight or daylight.
  2.  Ventilation - The space around the unit should be sufficient to permit natural ventilation of the dwelling.
  3.  Quiet - Physical separation and/or screening should be provided between the dwelling unit and adjacent users and activities to permit the occupants to enjoy rest and privacy without undue interference from external noise.
  4.  Visual Privacy - Windows and entrances of a dwelling unit should be separated and/or screened from adjacent buildings and activities so as to permit residents to make full use of their interior living spaces. Visual privacy within a dwelling unit is affected by the frequency, duration, and proximity of potential intrusions outside the unit. These will determine the type of separation or screening required.
  5. Application of Setback and Separation Space - The minimum setback or separation space in front of any window or opening should be applied along the full length and height of the exterior wall. Separation spaces should be free of buildings, roadways, communal parking areas and any communal amenity areas intended for active use, and should generally fall within the boundaries of the development. The minimum setback or separating space distances between two dwelling units facing each other should be equal to the sum of minium setback or separation spaces for the opposing walls. The following Table 2.1, describes the setbacks or separation spaces.

2.6. Private Outdoor Space for Residential Development

2.6.1. Objective

To provide private outdoor areas directly related to the dwelling unit which can effectively extend the living area of the unit.

2.6.2. Definitions

(a) Private Outdoor Space – means the exterior area adjacent to and directly accessible from the dwelling unit for the exclusive use of the residents of that dwelling and includes balconies, terraces, patios, and other similar areas as required under the Ontario Building.

(b) Family Type Dwelling Unit - means a unit with two or more bedrooms and with a main entrance no more than three levels above "grade" or street level. Where a podium is intensively developed as an artificial grade (perhaps above a parking structure or a commercial use). This podium may count as grade with respect to identifying the distance of a family unit from the ground. Such a podium should be no more than two storeys above the street.

2.6.3. Private Outdoor Space

(a) Type

(i) The type of private outdoor space should relate to the anticipated type of households which will occupy the dwelling units.

(ii) Family type dwellings should have private outdoor space at grade or directly related to grade. Where a podium, no more than two storeys above actual grade, is intensively developed as an artificial grade, this podium may count as grade.

(iii) Private outdoor space at grade shall be required in grade related condominium, detached and semi-detached housing, single attached, stacked and other similar housing types. In these forms of housing, private outdoor space may be located on any side of the dwelling. The private outdoor space should be enhanced by patios, porches, verandahs, fencing, planting, or other built-in features. Private outdoor space at grade may also be used for the ground level units of apartment buildings.

(iv) Private outdoor space above grade may be provided in apartment buildings but also in all other types of housing where appropriate.

(b) Access

(i) For ease of maintenance, an on-grade private outdoor space should be accessible from the front of the unit without requiring access through a living or dining room. (ii) A private outdoor space should be easily accessible from a principle habitable room such as a living room. Provide barrier free access where required under the Ontario Building Code.

(c) Privacy

(i) Separation between a private outdoor space and adjacent uses should be sufficient to define the territorial boundaries between these uses. This can be accomplished by distance separation or screening.

(ii) Where screening alone is used to provide separation between abutting on grade privacy areas, this screening should be at least 1.8 m (6 feet) high. For screening details, see the Landscaping Section 9.

(d) Parking Separation (See Figure 2.1)

(i) Common parking lots should not be closer than 3 m (9.8 feet) to a private outdoor space.

(ii) Private outdoor spaces which are more than 1 m (3 feet) lower than a common parking lot should be separated by not less than 7.5 m (25 feet) with appropriate screening and by not less than 15 m (50 feet) without appropriate screening.

(iii) Parking spaces should be oriented so that headlights and fumes are not directed towards the private outdoor space by using a parallel parking arrangement or by screening with planting or fencing.

(e) Orientation

(i) The private outdoor space should be designed and oriented to take advantage of interesting views.

Table 2.1: SETBACK & SEPARATION SPACE GUIDELINES FOR MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT1

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Table 2.1

 1  Setback does not include Front Yard Setbacks, being generally the distance between the front fact of the building and the street line. 2  Maintenance Agreement with abutting property owner is necessary.

FIGURE 2.1: PARKING SEPARATION

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Parking lot on private outdoor space for residential development parking seperation example.

* Note: The clear throat distance varies depending upon the number of parking spaces.

3. EXTERNAL FACILITIES AND WORKS PROVIDED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SITE

3.1. Objective

To ensure that no person undertakes development unless the municipal services normally required by The City of London are available to service the land, buildings or structure. (See Council policies on the Capital Works Budget, Industrial Oversize Reserve Fund, Urban Growth Capital Works Reserve Fund and the Municipal Services Section in the applicable Zoning By-law). (See also Official Plan Policies 2.6.4, 17.1, 17.2.5, 17.2.6.)

3.2. Design of Works to Be Assumed

Where facilities and works external to the site are provided in conjunction with the development of the site, the plans are to be prepared by a consulting engineer and must be submitted to the Managing Director, Development & Compliance Services & Chief Building Official for approval prior to construction of said works and facilities. Detailed cost estimates are also required of the total cost, including the City's share of such costs. The facilities and work shall be constructed and accepted by the City prior to the occupancy of any building on the site taking place, unless otherwise approved by the City Engineer.

3.3. "As-Constructed"Drawings

"As-constructed" drawings of any facilities and works to be assumed by the City will be required prior to the full release of security. This requirement applies to works on any easement which the City must maintain. Drawings shall be completed to the specifications of the City Engineer.

3.4. Certificate of Works to be Assumed

Facilities and works to be assumed by the City within a public highway, walkway or easement shall be inspected and certified by the owner's consulting engineer. The form of certification is to be substantially the same as the one listed as development agreement standard clause No. 4.

3.5. Works Eligible for a Claim

Some external facilities and works may be eligible for either an Urban Growth Capital Works Claim, and/or the City Services Fund, and/or a Capital Works Budget Claim and/or Industrial Oversizing Claim. Eligibility for these claims must be approved by the City prior to construction and subsequent to entering into a development agreement.

3.6. Security

Security is required to ensure the completion of external works. Security may be reduced as stages of construction are completed.

4. ROAD WIDENING

4.1. Site Plan

(a) The site plan shall show the land to be dedicated prior issuance of the development agreement. The land shall be free and clear of any encumbrances.

(b) The site plan shall show the ultimate road widening, and all buildings, parking access, etc. will be set back beyond the ultimate road widening in accordance with the zoning by-law.

(c) The City of London’s Official Plan establishes a basis for the widths of road allowances. Based on this, the City’s zoning by-law Z-1 sets out the actual ultimate road allowance widths. The zoning by- law also establishes that setbacks for parking, buildings, etc. are to be from the ultimate road allowance. In addition to this, the intersections of some streets will require sight triangles and in some cases increased widenings to accommodate Bus Rapid Transit Systems (BRT) in the future, in accordance with the zoning by-law.

(d) In some cases, road widenings are required for existing sites where substantial additions or changes are being proposed. Where no road works are proposed in front of the subject property, the dedication is required, however, the property owner may be given permission to continue to use the lands subject to items such as: entry into a modified boulevard parking agreement with the City, provision of insurance to indemnify and save the City harmless. (See Official Plan Policies 18.2.4, 18.2.5, and Council Policy 25(62).)

5. ACCESS TO AND FROM SITE

5.1. Objective

(a) To provide for the orderly and safe movement of traffic in and out of private properties with minimum interference to vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic using the public road system, as intended by the Official Plan (see Official Plan Policy 18.2.6).

(b) To ensure that works on the road allowance are up to the standards prescribed by the City as provided for in the Streets By- law, and with the City of London Access Management Guidelines.

5.2. Access Driveway - Definition

Any area constructed within the public road allowance, connecting a paved public street with private property, for the purpose of providing access and egress for motor vehicles to private property.

5.3. Number of Accesses

(a) The number of access driveways should be minimized on all streets. Each development will be analyzed in terms of the site characteristics, including street frontage, land area, traffic generation and parking capacity to determine the desirable number and locations of access driveways. Driveways to arterial streets should be avoided if a site can have an access to a collector street.

(b) The design of driveway entrances located along transit routes will take into consideration the functional aspects of the transit operation, and ensure that driveways are co-ordinated with transit facilities. Relocation of transit stops are subject to the approval of the London Transit Commission and the City. Any such works if approved will be at the sole expense of the developer.

(c) In some cases, property owners will be required to construct a joint access in accordance with the Access Management Guidelines.

5.4. Joint Accesses

Where required, joint accesses with abutting property owners shall be installed and the site plan shall show the location and construction, all in accordance with the standards referred to herein. If the joint access is to be provided for in the future, the site plan shall show the proposed location and the development agreement shall make provision for this as well.

5.5. Location

(a) Access driveways should be located opposite other existing, proposed access driveways, or public streets to avoid offset conditions and associated difficulties with the provision of required left turn storage lanes on the street. In all cases, major access driveways to arterial streets, when permitted, shall be located to allow for effective traffic progression on the arterial route.

(b) At the property line with an adjacent property or lane, a curb length of not less than 1 m (3 feet) shall be blended between the near edge of the driveway and  the property line projected at right angles to the curb line. (c) Where more than one private entrance serves the same lands from the same street, the entrances shall be separated to the satisfaction of the City Engineer.

(d) Where an entrance/exit is divided by an island, a minimum island width of 1.8 m (6 feet) and a point 1.2 m (4 feet) outside of the curb line, may be permitted between adjacent one-way drives serving as a combined entrance/exit facility. Such driveways must be clearly signed as entrance and exit. The detailed design shall accommodate turning radii for large vehicles.

All entrance/exits shall provide a minimum clear throat from the ultimate road allowance onto private property as set out in the Access Management Guidelines.

(e) Spacing of drives serving the same site or adjacent sites should be consistent with the access management guidelines. In some cases, a Traffic Impact Study may be required to confirm access locations and designs in accordance with Access Management Guidelines.

5.6. Angular Placement

The centre line, for a distance of at least 6 m (20 feet), of a two-way driveway shall meet the curb line as close as practical to a 90 degree angle and the centre line of a one-way driveway may meet the curb line at an angle less than a right angle, but not less than 60 degrees.

5.7. Width

The scale, size and intensity of a project may affect the size and extent of a driveway serving a complex. (See Access Management Guidelines) The minimum width of a drive serving a residential complex is 6.7m and may be increased to accommodate turning movements. The radius of each side of the drive shall be at least 9 meters. For Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Uses, the driveways shall be at least 9 meters in width but not exceed 12m in width, and the radius on driveway shall be increased to provide for the size of vehicles potentially accessing these sites.

5.8. Design

(a) All access driveways should be constructed with raised curbs and surfaced with asphalt or other hard surface approved by the City Engineer.

(b) Vertical grades of access driveways should be 2% (1:50) for a minimum distance of 6 m (20 feet) on the site from the street line.

(c) Sidewalks, curbs and gutters should be continuous and level across access driveways (see City of London Engineering standards).

5.9. Abandoned Driveways

These driveways shall be removed and replaced with sidewalks, boulevards, curbs and gutters, all to the specifications of the Managing Director, Environmental &  Engineering Services and City Engineer. This work shall be shown on the site plan.

5.10. Property Line Grading

(a) The property line (including the adjacent boulevards) abutting road allowances of arterial and primary collectors shall be graded to blend with the future road grades proposed for the street. City standard, entitled "Subdivision Grading along Arterial and Primary Collectors Roads" shall be used to establish these grades. Where these future grades have not been established yet by the City Engineer, the owner shall at no expense to the City retain a consulting engineer to obtain the necessary information to establish the future grades and have such approved by the City Engineer.

(b) On all other streets not mentioned in (a) above, the owner shall grade the property line and adjacent boulevards so that they blend with the existing street grade to the specifications of the Managing Director, Environmental & Engineering Services and City Engineer.

(c) The site plan shall show the grades of the property line and boulevards as described in (a) and (b) above.

5.11. Utilities Within Road Allowance

The owner shall, in addition to obtaining a permit of approved works from the City for work within the road allowance ensure that all the utilities are contacted. Underground utility locations must, however, be verified in the field by the respective utilities. Non-standard locations for new utilities or services must be approved by the Utilities Co-ordinating Committee. In some cases, a Traffic Management Plan will be required to be submitted to demonstrate items such as: how the flow of traffic will be maintained; safety issues; etc. for any work on the City Road Allowance.

5.12. Boulevards

All new, disturbed or reinstated boulevards shall be sodded except boulevards less than 1.0 m (3.0 ft.) in width, between the sidewalk and curb or edge of pavement, which shall be paved with interlocking paving stones, asphalt, or concrete, unless the City Engineer approves sodding. Boulevards 1 metre (3.0 ft.) or wider may be paved with the approval and to the specifications of the City Engineer.

6. PARKING FACILITIES AND INTERNAL DRIVEWAYS

6.1. Objective

(a) To provide for adequate parking and loading facilities, orderly circulation within the parking area and an attractive community appearance (see Official Plan Policies 6.11, 7.2.15, 8.5, 9.1.7.7, 12.6.1, 14.2.2.10 and Council Policy 25(56)).

(b) To encourage site planning and architectural design that is compatible with effective transit services.

6.2. Off-Street Parking Facilities

(a) Number of Spaces

(i) Refer to the applicable zoning by-law for the total number of required parking spaces.

(ii) Visitor Parking: Multi-unit residential development including cluster detached dwellings developments with a total of three or more units shall provide a common area(s) for visitor designated and signed parking spaces. One (1) visitor parking space shall be provided for every ten (10) dwelling units. The number of visitor parking spaces may be included within the total number of parking spaces required by the applicable zoning by-law. Where feasible, visitor parking shall be centrally located to serve all units. These may be distributed in small clusters to better serve the complex. Driveways or parking spaces that are, or may be perceived for the exclusive use in association with a dwelling unit will not be considered as a visitor parking space.

(iii) Barrier free parking is to be provided for buildings in accordance with the Ontario Building Code and in accordance with the zoning by-law, where identified.

(b) Location - Parking areas should be no closer than 3 metres (10 feet) to street line and 1.5 metres (5 feet) to a property line.

(c) Commercial parking areas may be located in the interior and/or rear yards, and are discouraged from being in the front or exterior yards depending upon:

  1.  predominant parking location on sites in the vicinity, location of adjacent commercial parking areas;
  2.  existence of adjacent non-commercial land use; and
  3. convenience to proposed uses.
  4.  prohibitions in the zoning by-law.
  5.  in cases where parking is permitted in the front yard or exterior yard, adequate screening is required.

(d) Where feasible, parking should not be permitted in a yard adjacent to a residential zone. Where such parking is permitted, adequate screening will be required (see Section 9 on landscaping) . (e) Schools – car parking and bus loading areas are to be located on private property.

(f) Residential parking areas should be located:

  1. in view of dwellings and activity areas, preferably 45 m (150 feet) maximum walking distance;
  2.  adjacent to pedestrian systems;
  3.  convenient to the building entrances; and
  4. no closer that 3 m (10 ft.) to a window of a habitable room.

(g) Where the applicable zoning by-law regulations do not specify the size of parking spaces and aisles, the relevant standard minimum parking dimensions set out in Figure 6.1 and Table 6.1, shall be used and the spaces shall be clearly marked.

(h) Parking rows should be delineated by poured concrete curbs or planters at each end to prevent uncontrolled internal traffic movements and generally to confine traffic to designated parking aisles or driveways.

(i) Parking areas shall be designed so as to not require vehicles to reverse from the property onto a public street.

(j) Access to and from parking aisles should be minimized along main feeder driveways.

(k) No more than 15 parking spaces should be permitted in a row without an interrupting minimum 3 m (10 ft.) width planting area.

(l) For developments abutting transit routes, parking areas are encouraged in locations to the side or rear of the building. The extent to which parking areas are feasible in locations to the side and rear of commercial buildings will be subject to both the visibility of customer parking as a marketing factor and public safety concerns respecting surveillance from abutting streets and buildings.

(m) Barrier free parking spaces shall be located in close proximity to the building’s barrier free entrance.

6.3. Internal Driveways

(a) Main internal driveways which are heavily travelled should be delineated by raised curbs or equivalent barriers and be designed not to have parking spaces on either side where possible.

(b) Intersections of driveways and parking aisles should be at a 90 degree angle.

(c) The horizontal alignment of all driveways should be geometrically sound, but lengthy straight sections should be minimized to discourage speeding.

(d) The design of driveway and parking aisle intersections should ensure adequate visibility of intersecting traffic movements.

(e) In large commercial developments, main internal driveways should not be located abutting building entrances in order to minimize pedestrian and vehicle conflicts.

(f) Driveways adjacent to a building should be a maximum width of 6.7 m (22 ft.) for two-way traffic and 3.35 m (11 ft.) for one-way traffic to deter parking in the driveway.

6.4. Paving

All surfaces used for parking or vehicular circulation shall be paved with asphalt or other equivalent hard surface approved by the Director, Development Services. Consideration may be given to alternative surface materials such as turfstone, cobblestone, etc., that allow precipitation to percolate into the soil, for any parking spaces provided over the minimum number required. All materials used should be capable of being indelibly marked to designate the parking spaces provided.

Note: See the Lighting, Grading, Landscaping, and Fencing Sections for these aspects of parking lot design.

TABLE 6.1: OFF-STREET PARKING AREA

Location

- preferably not adjacent to a residential zone

- minimum 3 m to street line

- minimum 1.5 m to property line

Layout

- See Figure 6.1

- maximum in uninterrupted row - 15

Internal Driveways

Intersections

Width Minimum

Width Maximum

 

- 90 °

  Parking Two Sides Parking One Sides
90 ° 6.5 m 7.5 m
60 ° 4.5 m 5.4 m
45 ° 3.4 m 4.2 m
30 ° 3.1 m 3.8 m
Parallel 3.8 m 3.8 m

- adjacent to a building n wider than the minimum width

Pedestrian Circulation - normally no separate facility required
Paving - asphalt or other hard surface**
Parking Module - if overhang space of 0.6 m is provided, the module of parking and manoeuvring space may be reduced accordingly.

* Including units served by a connecting local road. **Including previous paving where feasible.

FIGURE 6.1: PARKING STANDARDS – RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL USES

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Relevant standard minimum parking dimensions for off-street parking facilities. This is for both residential and commercial use.

FIGURE 6.2: PARKING STRUCTURES

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Off-street parking facilities parking structures example.

 

6.5. Parking Structures

Consideration should be given to the use of parking structure in higher intensity developments. These can consist of underground parking, sunken open air parking lots with usable roof decks or sundecks over individual parking spaces. Parking structures should be architecturally treated and landscaped. Parking spaces and driveway isles are to be consistent with surface parking driveway standards. The entrance drive to a parking structure should be designed in accordance with Figure 6.2.

6.6. Off-Street Loading Facilities

(a) Definitions

(i) Loading Facility means a loading space or bay along with any manoeuvring area required as part of the loading facility and which is located on the site, either within a building or adjacent to a building.

(ii) Loading Space means a paved area exclusively for loading and unloading trucks either within a building or adjacent to a building and does not include any manoeuvring space.

(b) Number of Spaces

Refer to the applicable zoning by-law.

(c) Minimum Size

Where under the applicable zoning by-law there are regulations concerning loading facilities but no dimensions are given, then the following shall apply:

Width Height Length

Industrial 3.6 m (12 ft.) 4.5 m (15 ft.) 20 m (65 ft.) Other 3.6 m (12 ft.) 4.25 m (14 ft.) 9 m (30 ft.)

(d) Access

All loading spaces or loading areas should have associated space on the property to provide truck manoeuvring. Such areas should be shown on the plan and none of these vehicles will be permitted to reverse onto or from the street abutting the property, unless otherwise permitted in the zoning by-law. Roads providing access to building fronts and fire routes are to be designed to support emergency vehicles, e.g. fire trucks.

(e) Location

Access to loading facilities may be by separate access or by an internal driveway serving a parking area. Loading spaces are to be located in accordance with the zoning by-law.

(f) Paving

All loading spaces, manoeuvring areas and driveways should be hard surfaced with suitable materials to the satisfaction of the City Engineer, i.e., concrete, asphalt, lockstone, etc.

(g) Joint Loading Facilities

In shopping centres or other similar integrated development, the use of joint loading facilities to serve all or several individual businesses will be encouraged.

Note: See Figure 6.3 for typical parking layout on a site plan.

6.7. Fire Department Access

(a) Access routes for firefighting including the location, width, turning radius, vertical alignment and location of fire route signs shall be shown on the site plan (a sample site plan is shown in Figure 6.3 Private Property Fire Routes).

(b) When required in association with a development, fire routes shall be constructed, installed and maintained by the owner in accordance with Table 6.2 Design Standards for Fire Routes. The construction, installation and maintenance of fire routes shall include fire route signs in accordance with Table 6.3 Design and Installation Standards for Fire Route Signs.

FIGURE 6.3: PRIVATE PROPERTY FIRE ROUTES

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Example of a site plan for private property fire routes.

Schedule “A”

TABLE 6.2: DESIGN STANDARDS FOR FIRE ROUTES

Width: 6.0 metres
Overhead Clearance: 5.0 metres
Minimum Centreline Turning Radius: 12.0 metres
Maximum Gradient:

1 vertical in 12.5 horizontal over a minimum distance of 15 metres

Maximum Dead end Distance without an Approved Turnaround Facility: 90 metres
Design Loading:

To support the expected loads of firefighting equipment

Surface Material: Concrete, asphalt or other material designed to permit accessibility under all climate conditions.

TABLE 6.3: DESIGN AND INSTALLATION STANDARDS FOR FIRE ROUTE SIGNS

Sign Plate Lettering, colour, size and material in accordance with Figure 6.4
Sign Post Type and material in accordance with Figure 6.4
Sign Mounting Alternatives

a) standard sign post (figure 6.4)

b) light standard or other equivalent utility pole located not more than 1.8 metres from the limit of the fire route

c) fences, landscape walls and building faces located not more than 1.8 metres from the limit of the fire route (Figure 6.5)

Mounting Height no greater than 3 metres measured from the top limit of the sign to the grade of the fire route surface adjacent to the fire route sign and no less than 2.4 metres to the bottom of the sign
Spacing between Signs not more than 30 metres (100 ft) between signs located on the same side of the Fire Route and spaced such that at least 1 sign is clearly visible and lettering is legible within the Fire Route
Location of Signs

a) Fire Routes greater than 9.1 metres in width - one side of the Fire Route

b) Fire Routes 6.1 metres and less than 9.1 metres in width - both sides of the Fire Route

Setback from the Fire Route

a) where a curb or equivalent edge treatment is not provided to define the edge of the Fire Route - minimum 3.0 metres (10 ft) and maximum 4.0 metres (13 ft) to any part of the sign

b) where a curb or equivalent edge treatment is provided to define the edge of the Fire Route - minimum 0.3 metres (1 ft) and maximum 1.8 metre (6 ft) to any part of the sign

Sign Orientation at an angle of not less than 30 degrees and not more than 45 degrees to a line parallel to the flow of traffic, except for wall mounted signs
Visibility the property owner is responsible to ensure that physical obstructions are not placed or constructed in locations that interfere with the visibility and/or legibility of any Fire Route sign and to ensure sufficient maintenance of vegetation such that unobstructed views to all Fire Route Signs are maintained at all times and under all circumstances.

Notes:

  • Residential Complexes signage for fire routes is to be placed on both sides of the internal drive. Fire route signs should be mounted on light standards where possible to minimize visual clutter.
  •  Commercial Complexes signage for fire routes is to be placed on both sides of the internal drives. Where drives exceed 9.1 metres in width, signage adjacent to the building is acceptable. In both cases, additional signage may be needed to adequately accommodate bends or deflections of the drive being used as a fire route.
  • Fire Route Signs adjacent to the street line & the drive entrance shall be FR3 (see figure 6.3)
  • “Deadend” drives less than 30m in length are required to have signs on both sides of the drive at the beginning and the end of the drive.

FIGURE 6.4: FIRE ROUTE SIGN DETAILS

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Example of design and installation standards for fire route signs.

FIGURE 6.5

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Example of design and installation standards for wall mounted fire route signs.

Appendix B (Additions/Deletions)

6.7. Fire Department Access

(a) Access routes for firefighting including the location, width, turning radius, vertical alignment and location of fire route signs shall be shown on the site plan (a sample site plan is shown in Figure 6.3 Private Property Fire Routes).

(b) When required in association with a development, fire routes shall be constructed, installed and maintained by the owner in accordance with Table 6.2 Design Standards for Fire Routes. The construction, installation and maintenance of fire routes shall include fire route signs in accordance with Table 6.3 Design and Installation Standards for Fire Route Signs.

FIGURE 6.3: PRIVATE PROPERTY FIRE ROUTES

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Example of a site plan for private property fire routes.

 

Table 6.2: DESIGN STANDARDS FOR FIRE ROUTES

Width 6.0 metres
Overhead Clearance 5.0 metres
Minimum Centreline Turning Radius 12.0 metres
Maximum Gradient

1 vertical in 12.5 horizontal over a minimum distance of 15 metres

Maximum Dead end Distance without an Approved Turnaround Facility 90 metres
Design Loading

To support the expected loads of firefighting equipment

Surface Material Concrete, asphalt or other material designed to permit accessibility under all climate conditions.

Table 6.3: DESIGN AND INSTALLATION STANDARDS FOR FIRE ROUTE SIGNS

Sign Plate Lettering, colour, size and material in accordance with Figure 6.4
Sign Post Type and material in accordance with Figure 6.4
Sign Mounting Alternatives

a) standard sign post (figure 6.4)

b) light standard or other equivalent utility pole located not more than 4 1.8 metres from the limit of the fire route

c) fences, landscape walls and building faces located not more than 4 1.8 metres from the limit of the fire route (Figure 6.5)

Mounting Height

no greater than 3 metres measured from the top limit of the sign to the grade of the fire route surface adjacent to the fire route sign and no less than 2.4 metres to the bottom of the sign

Spacing between Signs not more than 30 metres (100 ft) between signs located on the same side of the Fire Route and spaced such that at least 1 sign is clearly visible and lettering is legible from all locations within the Fire Route
Location of Signs

a) Fire Routes greater than 9.1 6.1 metres in width - one side of the Fire Route

b) Fire Routes 6.1 metres and or less than 9.1 metres in width - both sides of the Fire Route

Setback from the Fire Route

a) where a curb or equivalent edge treatment is not provided to define the edge of the Fire Route - minimum 3.0 metres (10 ft) and maximum 4.0 metres (13 ft) to any part of the sign

b) where a curb or equivalent edge treatment is provided to define the edge of the Fire Route - minimum 0.3 metres (1 ft) and maximum 1.0 1.8 metre (6 ft) to any part of the sign

Sign Orientation at an angle of not less than 30 degrees and not more than 45 degrees to a line parallel to the flow of traffic, except for wall mounted signs
Visibility the property owner is responsible to ensure that physical obstructions are not placed or constructed in locations that interfere with the visibility and/or legibility of any Fire Route sign and to ensure sufficient maintenance of vegetation such that unobstructed views to all Fire Route Signs are maintained at all times and under all circumstances

Notes:

  •  Residential Complexes signage for fire routes is to be placed on both sides of the internal drive. Fire route signs should be mounted on light standards where possible to minimize visual clutter.
  •  Commercial Complexes signage for fire routes is to be placed on both sides of the internal drives. Where drives exceed 9.1 metres in width, signage adjacent to the building is acceptable. In both cases, additional signage may be needed to adequately accommodate bends or deflections of the drive being used as a fire route.
  •  Fire Route Signs adjacent to the street line & the drive entrance shall be FR3 (see figure 6.3)
  •  “Deadend” drives less than 30m in length are required to have signs on both sides of the drive at the beginning and the end of the drive

FIGURE 6.4 (REVISED): FIRE ROUTE SIGN DETAILS

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Example of design and installation standards for fire route signs.

FIGURE 6.5

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Example of design and installation standards for wall mounted fire route signs.

6.8. Transit Routes on Private Property

(a) Trip-generating/activity nodes such as the downtown area, regional and community shopping areas, recreational, entertainment and cultural facilities, major employment facilities and high density residential uses shall be designed to facilitate pedestrian and transit use. Where potential transit ridership warrants and to minimize the walking distance between facilities and transit stops, transit routes may be extended from the municipal road system onto a private development site. Proponents of development that may benefit by the design of a transit route on private property are encouraged to undertake early consultation with the London Transit Commission and City staff.

(b) Site plan applications shall be reviewed for potential transit routes on private property, where the scale of a development exceeds the following general criteria:

Residential (medium and high density) 700 units

  • Institutions 5,000m 2 GFA
  • Commercial/Office 7,000 2 GFA
  • Industrial (employees) 500 people
  • Recreation 5,000 m 2 GFA

NOTE: The purpose of these general criteria are to allow the evaluation of large scale development projects for possible transit routes on private property. Smaller development proposals however, may also be considered for transit routes on private properties where warranted.

(c) The review of transit routes on private property shall take into consideration the cumulative effects of the abutting existing and future developments when considering the potential transit ridership.

(d) Routing for transit vehicles through private development shall be direct and efficient. Road alignments should follow a linear pattern with no parking or loading activities along the designated transit route. The route shall be designed to give priority to transit vehicles over private automobiles.

(e) Transit stop locations, bus loading pads and transit passenger amenities should be designed to provide for the comfort including shade trees where feasible, convenience and safety of the transit passenger and be barrier free accessible.

(f) The design of a transit route on private property shall be in accordance with the following design standards:

  1.  15 metre minimum inside turning radius
  2.  3.7 metre minimum lane width along straight sections of the route plus an additional 0.5 metre width along 15 metre radius curves
  3.  5% maximum grade
  4.  the transit route shall be designed to a standard sufficient to carry the weight of bus traffic.

(g) Night lighting shall be provided in a continuous manner along all transit routes on private property and shall provide lighting levels to the satisfaction of the London Transit Commission during the non-daylight hours of the operation of bus service.

(h) Transit passenger amenity areas that are incorporated within the buildings of a development shall include night light levels to the satisfaction of the London Transit Commission and shall be lit and accessible during the hours of operation of the bus service.

6.8.1. Building Entrance Facilities for Paratransit Vehicles

(a) Building entrance facilities suitable to accommodate paratransit vehicle access shall be required for all commercial, institutional, and recreation development projects and for all residential development where the number of residential units exceeds 24 units per building.

(b) The location of building entrance facilities is encouraged immediately adjacent to the principal entrance of the building and shall not exceed a maximum distance of 15 metres between the building entrance and the closest accessible location of paratransit vehicles. An overhead structure for weather protection is encouraged between the vehicle location and the building entrance.

(c) The building entrance facility shall include a separate hard surfaced loading pad for use by paratransit and other service vehicles with minimum dimensions of 3.5 metres wide by 12.0 metres. The loading pad shall be located adjacent to and accessible from the internal driveway system and shall not conflict with other parking or manoeuvring facilities.

(d) The alignment of internal driveways for use by paratransit vehicles shall be designed to permit the safe and efficient movement of vehicles in a manner that allows paratransit vehicles to travel from the municipal roadway through the building entrance facility and return to the municipal roadway without any reversing movements. Building entrance facilities and internal driveway that provide access to the entrance facility shall be designed with a minimum outside turning radius of 9.0 metres.

(e) In order to provide full paratransit vehicle access, plans shall provide continuous driveways on private property for all buildings (no reversals).

6.9 Joint Use of Common Driveways

(a) The site plans should show all works necessary to build the common internal drive to the property line including any temporary barriers to be removed when the common internal drive is constructed in the adjoining property. The common internal driveway provides traffic flow from one site to the next.

(b) Where transit facilities are required on private property, the site plan will show the integration of the transit facilities with the proposed development and abutting lands where they are integrated.

7. WALKWAYS AND ALL OTHER MEANS OF PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

7.1. Objective

To ensure the provision of safe and convenient pedestrian circulation including facilities for persons with disabilities, senior citizens, and children (see Official Plan Policies 11.1.1 and 18.2.14).

7.2. Pedestrian Facilities on Private Property

(a) Senior Citizens and Persons with Disabilities – Pedestrian facilities shall be designed to enable senior citizens and persons with disabilities to travel unassisted from the fronting public sidewalk to at least one main building entrance and one main parking area by incorporating sidewalk ramps of a proper gradient and surfacing material instead of steps or staircases, and handrails. These pedestrian facilities shall not only include the connection from the street and parking area but also provide interconnection from building to building. Reference should be made to the appropriate section of the Ontario Building Code (see Appendix 5 of OBC).

(b) Location - Sidewalks and pedestrian walkways shall be located to join building(s) access points to other use areas of the site such as parking areas, and recreational uses, and abutting public street sidewalks. Pedestrian walkways should be located in accordance with user needs and the desire lines produced from inter-relationship of locating elements of the site plan. Where no public sidewalk exists, the installation of same across the frontage of the site will be normally a requirement of development in accordance with the standards of the City Engineer. Table 7.1 describes the design characteristics of pedestrian walkways.

7.3 Transit Related Walkways

(a) Pedestrian access to buildings located on properties that abut a transit route shall include sidewalks that provide barrier free, direct and convenient access from the adjacent transit stop facilities to the building entrance in order to reduce the walking distance to and from transit stops.

TABLE 7.1: WALKWAY DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS

Element Characteristic
(a) Minimum Width of Walkway 1.5 m (5.0 ft.) minimum*

(b) Maximum Slope:

Grade

Crossfall

 

1:10 (except as required for barrier free access)

 

1:50

(c) Surfacing Material:

(i) Main Walkways

- walkways that connect building or unit entries to parking, loading and drop-off areas and to municipal streets

(ii)Secondary Walkways

- walkways that connect the main walkways to amenity areas such as on-site recreation facilities and park pathways

(iii) Barrier free paths of travel are to be a different texture from the other sidewalk surfaces in accordance with the Ontario Building Code (OBC)

 

Poured-in-place concrete, interlocking paving stone

 

 

Poured-in-lace concrete, interlocking paving stone, asphalt or other hard surfacing

 

 

 

Brushed concrete, painted lines on asphalt or as otherwise permitted under the Ontario Building Code (OBC)

(d) (i) Stairs**:

Maximum per flight

Minimum per flight

Width

(ii) Ramps

 

 

14 risers

2 risers

Same as accompanying walkway

Slopes in accordance with the OBC

(e) Handrails

For more than 3 steps and for ramps as required under the OBC

(f) Lighting Special lighting to ensure safety
(g) Minimum Setback from Parking Areas1 1 m (3 ft.)

1 Setback is required to accommodate vehicular overhang and the deposition of snow. * Increase walkways abutting parking spaces by at least 0.6 m (2 ft.) ** Stairs are not permitted in the road allowance.

FIGURE 7.1: PARKING SPACE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITES TYPE A

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Example of parking space for persons with disabilities. Type A.

FIGURE 7.2: PARKING SPACE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITES TYPE B

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Example of parking space for persons with disabilities. Type B.

FIGURE 7.3 ACCESSIBLE PARKING SIGN HIGHWAY TRAFFIC ACT, REGULATION 581

PRESCRIBED SIGNS FOR PARKING SPACES UNDER THE HIGHWAY TRAFFIC ACT, REGULATION 581 PRESCRIBED SIGNS FOR PARKING SPACES DESIGNATED UNDER A MUNICIPAL BY-LAW FOR THE USE OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

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An example of prescribed signs for parking spaces under the Highway Traffic Act, Regulation 581.

FIGURE 7.4: INTERNATIONAL SYMBOL OF ACCESS (OPTIONAL ON THE SURFACE OF THE PARKING SPACE)

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An example of the international symbol of access, which is optional to have on the surface of a parking space.

FIGURE 7.5: NO STOPPING SIGN

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An example of a no stopping sign, with dimensions included.

8. FACILITIES FOR LIGHTING, INCLUDING FLOODLIGHTING

8.1. Objectives

To provide sufficient illumination of the site for:

(a) pedestrian security and safety;

(b) functional vehicular movement;

(c) enhancement of external building design and landscaped open space;

(d) reduce or eliminate the potential of any adverse effect of artificial light such as: glare, light trespass, light clutter, energy waste.

The type, location, height, intensity and direction of lighting shall ensure that glare or light is not cast onto adjacent residential properties or natural areas adversely affecting living environment, or onto adjacent public streets which would pose a vehicular safety hazard. Moreover, energy conservation measures must be considered to ensure that the site is not illuminated more than it need be. In some cases, the extent of lighting may be required to be reduced after normal business hours. All lighting should be limited to, and directed towards, the area requiring illumination so as to reduce skyglow and light pollution and thereby promote bird-friendly development.

8.2. Yard Lighting

(a) Definition - Yard lighting illuminates broad areas such as parking lots, driveways, landscaped and recreational areas. Yard lighting is generally provided from fixtures mounted on poles or building faces.

(b) Height - For non-residential uses, the maximum height of all yard lighting fixtures shall be 15m (50 ft). For multi-family residential uses, the maximum height of all yard lighting fixtures shall be 6m (20 ft.).

(c) Design - Ornamentally designed fixtures shall be encouraged, particularly for residential developments, and developments that include pedestrian walkways, at main entrances of buildings, internal roadways, parking areas and vehicular entrances and exits.

(d) Light Study – a qualified engineer will prepare and provide a report demonstrating how the lighting is contained on the site and that the selection/style of light will not create glare and/or broadcast light onto adjacent properties or roadways, by the adjustment of refractors and/or the placement of shields (see Figure 8.1).”

(e) Elimination of Skyglow – So as to reduce skyglow, light pollution and related bird fatalities, all light fixtures to be provided are to be full cut-off and have zero up light.

8.3. Fascia Lighting and Floodlighting of Building

(a) Definition - Fascia lighting and floodlighting of the building illuminates precise areas of the building face(s) generally to compliment the architecture and provide illumination of the grounds adjacent to the building. Fascia lighting is usually provided by fixtures mounted on the building face(s) and/or located at grade in at he immediate vicinity of the building.

Figure 8.1: Light Standard - Sample

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An example of the light standards involved in the light study, which is taken on by a qualified engineer.

Wall Mounted Lights - Sample

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An example of the wall mounted light standards involved in the light study, which is taken on by a qualified engineer.

 

9. LANDSCAPING AND BUFFERING OF THE SITE

9.1. Objective

To increase shade on sites by using non-ornamental trees improve the aesthetics and function of the site, by providing for screening, the control of access to adjoining residential properties, shading, ornamentation, the reduction of storm water runoff and increasing the percentage of leaf cover in the City where sites are developed or redeveloped (see Official Plan Policies 11.1.1, 17.1.4, 17.6.2, 17.6.3, 17.6.4 and 17.6.5).

9.2. Guidelines

Definition

(a) "Landscaping" is comprised of deciduous and coniferous trees, shrubs, organic and herbaceous ground cover, berms, water courses, retaining walls, fences, furniture, and other materials or objects that may be used to enhance the function and/or aesthetics of the landscaped area.

(b) "Landscaped Open Space Areas" are comprised of that part of the site that is left open and free from building structures and surface parking areas.

(c) Leaf cover means the percentage of the site covered by the branching spread of the new trees planted as part of the site development.

9.3. Types of Landscaping (See fig. 9.1)

The two basic types of landscaping are "Screening" and "General Planting." The function of each type overlap. Screening can also be General and vice versa.

(a) Screening - Buffer Strips

(i) Purpose:

To visually screen and assist in noise reduction of less pleasing elements or areas on-site such as utility installations, parking areas, and service entrances; To visually screen and assist in noise reduction of abutting land uses from on-site parking areas, utility installations, service entrances or other on-site activity areas that may adversely affect the abutting land use; and To protect and thereby facilitate the function of certain use areas of the site, such as creating windbreaks or shelter for tennis courts, creating sunlight traps for outdoor swimming pools, and creating privacy areas in residential developments.

(ii) Location:

Screening should be located primarily around the perimeter of the site, parking areas, and service entrances. Other areas as listed in i) (above) should be screen landscaped as well.

(iii) Elements:

Screening includes the use of plants, hedges, walls, fences, and berms. The following Table 9.2 provides the generally acceptable design characteristics.

(b) General Planting

(i) Purpose:

To compliment the design of the building(s) and ensure an adequate leaf cover are established. To compliment and assist in the protection of existing trees, land forms, and watercourses; and To define certain spaces by enclosing or dividing areas such as passive and active recreation areas, pedestrian circulation, and entrances onto the site.

(ii) Location:

The location of planting is implicit in its purpose as defined in i) above. Plantings should be selected and be placed in such a manner not to conflict with pedestrian and/or vehicles.

(iii) Elements:

Planting includes the use of plants shade trees, hedges, walls, fences, and berms, and herbaceous or organic ground cover. The following Table 9.3 provides the generally acceptable design characteristics.

9.4. Plant Selection

The selection of plant material should be based on the following criteria. (a) Year Round and Seasonal Interest:

(i) colour of leaves, flowers, bark, stems, berries, cones;

(ii) height of planting through to maturity;

(iii) form and shape, particularly of tree species and by providing a tree canopy appropriate to the space;

(iv) foliage density in terms of penetration of sunlight through the tree;

(v) hardiness and suitability to the local environment with a preference for native species over non-native species (prohibit the use of non- invasive plants as listed in the city of London Boulevard Tree Protection); and

(vi) availability.

(b) Maintenance:

  1.  fertilizing;
  2. pruning; and
  3.  watering.

(c) Function:

  1.  wind protection;
  2.  seasonal shading; and
  3.  vandal resistance.

(d) Physical Conditions:

  1.  prevailing wind direction and velocities;
  2.  probability of frost;
  3.  atmospheric pollution/pest resistance;
  4.  natural availability of water from ground water, storm run-off, and precipitation;
  5.  proximity to buildings in terms of shadow and obstruction of sunlight;
  6.  proximity of roads and vehicular access ensuring that sight lines are not obstructed; and
  7.  proximity of municipal services and utilities ensuring that root systems do not obstruct sewers, and branches do not obstruct overhead hydro lines.
  8.  proximity to natural heritage features and natural areas by not selecting plant materials that are potentially harmful in accordance with the Guide to Plant Section for Natural Heritage Areas and Buffers.

Note: See Table 9.4 for Typical Plant Selection List (Sample Only) .

9.5. Parking Lot Landscaping

(a) Definitions:

There are two landscaping components of a parking area, namely:

(i) Interior - being the area defined by the perimetering curbs or edge of pavement; and

(ii) Periphery - being the landscape strips around the perimeter of the parking lot.

Both Screening and Shrub &; Shade Tree Planting should be included in the overall parking lot landscape scheme.

Interior:

  1.  One "planter" (island) should be provided for every 50 parking spaces.
  2.  Each planter should define a minimum of 10 m 2 (100 square feet) and provide for one tree with shrubs at the base and appropriate organic or herbaceous ground cover.
  3.  Each planter should be bounded by concrete curbing appropriately designed to prevent vehicles from damaging the landscape material (Figure 9.2). (Minimum 3.0 m width and at least 0.9 m depth of planting soil)
  4.  Planters/Islands should be located to break the monotony of continuous rows of parking spaces.
  5.  Where islands include a pedestrian walkway, the island width should be increased to accommodate the walk and pedestrian lighting (see figure 9.4)

Periphery:

A landscape strip should be provided and designed in accordance with Table 9.5.

(b) Construction:

Islands in parking lots require a minimum of 0.9 m depth of quality organic soil.

9.6 Maintenance

a) Subsequent to planting, the owner shall take steps to ensure plant materials are established to promote a healthy condition of all plant materials, by using good horticultural practices such as watering, fertilizing, pruning as required;

b) Subsequent to the acceptance of the plantings, owners are required to maintain all plantings in a healthy condition and to replace any dead materials.

9.7 Landscape Improvements on the Road Allowance

The municipality may require the improvements on the boulevard in front, beside or behind the property being developed. Such improvements may include without limitation trees, shrubs, hedges, plantings or other ground cover, permeable paving materials, street furniture, curb ramps, waste and recycling containers and bicycle parking facilities. These items are required in addition to any other landscape elements on private property in order to create a stronger landscaped streetscape. In some cases, the owner will be required to maintain these improvements, and will be required to carry insurance to indemnify and save the City harmless from any actions arising from these works. These items would be included in a licensing agreement in addition to the development agreement. In most cases, these works (boulevard trees) will be maintained by the City. Landscaping at the intersection of two City Road allowances shall not block sight lines.

TABLE 9.1: SCREENING DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS

Element Characteristic

1. Plants

(i) - choice

(ii) - size

 

- See Subsection 9.5

- Deciduous trees; minimum calliper 60 mm (2 ½ inches) - Coniferous trees; minimum height 2 m (6 ½ feet) - Shrubs; minimum volume 25 litres (6.5 gallons)

2. Fencing

(i) - Perimeter of Property 1

 

(ii) - Privacy Fencing 2

 

(iii) - Privacy Enclosures 3

 

- Height: 1.5 m (5 feet) - Type: chain link

- Height: 1.8 m (6 feet) minimum - Type: tight board, chain link with aluminum weaver and/or planting

- Height: 1.8 m (6 feet) - Type: chain link, masonry or tight board fence, mature hedges

3. Berms

- Slope: 2.5:1 maximum

- Height: 0.8 m (2.5 feet) minimum

- Plant Material: trees, shrubs, and herbaceous ground cover

- Location: must be located on private property only and be located not to obstruct the natural drainage pattern or the proposed drainage pattern

4. Walls (including retaining walls, enclosures, blank such as for parking structures) - Type: concrete, brick, stone, pressure treated timber or wood - Planting Materials: climbing vines and cascading varieties of building and structure plants to soften long expanses of wall at intervals of 3 m walls (10 feet)

1Fencing around the perimeter of the property is a normal requirement, but in some situations may not be necessary. Corner properties are often a special case where traffic related site lines must not be obstructed. 2Privacy Fencing may be used to separate privacy areas of the dwelling units, less pleasing areas of the site, and abutting land uses. 3 Privacy Enclosures are generally immediate to the dwelling unit in the form of an enclosed patio. 4 Retaining walls over 1 meter in height generally requires a building permit under the Ontario Building Code (OBC) and generally requires a guard in accordance with the OBC.

TABLE 9.2: ORNAMENTAL PLANTING DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS

Element Charactersitic

1. Plants

(i) - Choice

(ii) - Size

 

- See Subsection 9.5

 

 

- Deciduous trees; minimum calliper 60 mm

- Coniferous trees; minimum height 1.8 m (6 feet)

- Shrubs; minimum volume 25 litres (equivalent to a 6.5 gallon container)

2. Fencing

- See Fencing under Table 9..1

- Also other types of ornamental fencing are generally acceptable such as wrought iron

3. Berns

- Slope: 2.5:1 maximum

- Height: 0.6 m (2 feet) minimum (See Sec. 12 - Grading)

- Plant Material: trees, shrubs, herbaceous and other organic ground cover, and commercial surfacing material such as crushed stone, rock, or clay tiles

4. Walls - See “Walls”, Table 9.1

1Sizes should be increased on large mass buildings such as shopping centres and high-rise apartment buildings. 2Plantings on narrow berms without a flat area on top are to restricted to drought resistant species.

TABLE 9.3: PLANT SELECTION

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Table 9.2: Plant Selection

TABLE 9.4: DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF LANDSCAPE STRIPS

Landscape Strip Location Width Tree Planting Height of hedge Planting Height of Fence/Barrie Shrub and/or Vine Planting
Fronting onto a public street1 3 m (10 ft.) minimum 1 per 12 m (40 ft.) minimum 0.75 m (2.5 ft.) minimum 1.1 m (3.5 ft.) minimum 1 per 3 m (10 ft.) minimum or clustered as appropriate
Not Fronting onto a public street2 1.5 m (5 ft.) minimum 1 per 15 m (50 ft.) minimum 0.75 m (2.5 ft.) minimum 1.5 m (5 ft.) minimum 1 per 3 m (10 ft.) minimum or clustered as appropriate

1 No planting or fencing is required for a distance of 7.5 m (25 feet) on either side of an access driveway where it intersects with a public street. 2 Where high intense commercial or industrial uses abut residential uses, the width of the landscape strip should be increased to 4.5 m (15 feet). 3 Where smaller trees at maturity are used the spacing of the trees will need to be decreased. (see Appendix “B” of the city of London Tree Planting Guidelines for sizes)

Table 9.5: Plant Selection

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Table 9.5 Plant Selection

 Figure 9.1: SAMPLE LANDSCAPE PLAN (PARTIAL PLAN)

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An example of a landscaping plan. This is only a partial view of the sample plan.

Figure 9.2

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Site plan requirements for tree planters.

FIGURE 9.3

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An example of the section of a Landscape Planting Plan that shows detailed tree and potted shrub plating methods.

 Figure 9.4

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Examples of where parking lot landscaping should increase space to accommodate pedestrians and lighting.

10. FACILITIES AND ENCLOSURES FOR THE STORAGE OF GARBAGE AND RECYCLING

10.1. Objective

To ensure that adequate facilities are provided for:

  1. the storage of garbage and recycling between collections thereby avoiding health, safety and litter problems; and
  2.  the efficient and safe collection of garbage and recycling by collection vehicles.

(See Official Plan Policy 11.1.1, and the Waste Management By-law WM-12)

10.2. Methods of Storage and Collection

(see Collection Practices Table 10.1)

(a) Residential Rowhousing:

Storage: An individual area within or immediately associated with each unit is required for garbage storage between collection days. Outside storage of garbage or recyclables is not a recommended or preferred method of storage. Outside storage of garbage will only be permitted in situations where the developer demonstrates that individual storage facilities are not feasible. Outside storage of garbage will require an enclosure meeting the requirements of Table 10.2 Outside storage of recyclables is preferred if collection of recyclables is not practical from individual units from the boulevard of the abutting public street or private drive. Outside storage of recyclables will require an exterior storage enclosure meeting the requirements of Table 10.2. Outside storage of recyclables without an enclosure (i.e., exterior storage area) will only be permitted where the developer demonstrates that a recycling enclosure is not feasible.

Collection: If collection is by the City, it shall be at the boulevard of the abutting public street or private drive that is approved as a city collection vehicle access driveway. The collection vehicle access driveway shall be shown on the approved site services plan designed in accordance with Section 10.4 and Table 10.3. Units fronting to private driveways that are not accessible by City vehicles shall bring their garbage to communal collection points and their recyclables to exterior storage enclosures located at the boulevard of an abutting public street or private drive that is approved as a City collection vehicle access driveway.

b) Apartments:

(i) Buildings With 12 or Less Units:

Garbage

The garbage is centrally stored in specifically designed garbage rooms within the building, or exterior enclosures meeting the requirements of Table 10.2. Plastic garbage bags or metal or plastic cans (minimum 30L, maximum 125L) each not exceeding 20kg (44lbs.) may be used for garbage.

Recycling

The recycling can be stored within each unit, in a specifically designed storage room within the building, exterior storage area or exterior storage enclosure meeting the requirements of Table 10.2. If 360 litres carts are used, a minimum of two is required.

(ii) Buildings With More Than 12 Units:

Garbage

The garbage shall be centrally stored in specifically designed garbage rooms within the building. The garbage storage facilities shall consist of either 3.1, 4.6 or 6.1 cubic metre bulk bin containers located in the building and wheeled out to a collection point with access by garbage collection vehicles, meeting the requirements of Table 10.3, or the installation of a garbage compaction unit which is compatible with collection vehicles, meeting the requirements of Table 10.3. Exterior storage enclosures are permitted to store empty and full bulk bin containers.

Recycling

Recycling shall be stored in a specifically designed room within the building of sufficient size to accommodate one 360 litre cart for every seven residential units and allow for resident access and movement of the carts. For collection, carts shall be wheeled to a point within access, meeting the requirements of Table 10.3. Recycling carts must be compatible with City collection vehicles. Exterior storage enclosures are permitted to store empty and full recycling containers.

(c) Commercial, Institutional, Industrial:

(i) Commercial: For shopping centres, bulk bin containers are used. For individual stores and offices, depending on the volume of garbage or type of storage facilities cans, polyethylene bags or bulk bin containers may be used. For any integrated commercial uses exceeding 5000 sq. metres (50,000 sq. feet) of gross floor area, a central garbage storage should be provided. Consideration will be given to the use of a deep collection unit on site. The extent of screening for this is dependent upon its location and style.

(ii) Institutional: Depending on the volume of garbage and type of storage facility, cans, polyethylene bags, and bulk bin containers may be used. Consideration will be given to the use of a deep collection unit on site. The extent of screening for this is dependent upon its location and style.

(iii) Industrial: Depending on the volume of garbage or type of storage facility, cans, polyethylene bags or steel containers may be used. Consideration will be given to the use of a deep collection unit on site. The extent of screening for this is dependent upon its location and style.

(iv) City collection at Commercial, Institutional and Industrial properties is limited to 12 bags of garbage per collection and 5 Blue Boxes of recycling and 2 bundles of cardboard. These properties must be on an established residential collection route and no trade waste is permitted.

(d) Facilities for the Collection & Storage of Recyclable Materials   (i) Recycling in commercial, industrial or institutional buildings/ complexes is required. The plans for the complex shall locate the collection areas on the site plan. Any such locations shall be screened. Materials are to be separated as required for municipal pickup and/or in accordance with provincial standards.

(e) Facilities for Storage and Collection of Source Separated Organics

(i) May be provided for private waste collection.

10.3. Location of Storage

(a) Commercial, industrial, institutional and apartment developments may be exempt from the requirement for exterior enclosures if steel bulk bin containers are used and strategically located in combination with the building configuration to utilize areas such as recessed service areas or extended building walls so that the storage containers are not within public or neighbourhood view.

(b) If the development includes medical or dental offices or a drug store, the garbage storage facilities shall be located in a building or structure capable of being locked.

(c) Table 10.2 describes the design features of both garbage and recycling collection points and storage enclosures if permitted.

(d) All garbage and recycling containers must be located a minimum of 3 metres (10 feet) away from all buildings.

10.4. Accessibility by Collection Vehicles

(a) Where volumes of garbage and recycling warrant, collection vehicles will go on site providing there is ingress and egress with circulation designed to avoid reversal of the vehicle.

(b) Whether the garbage is collected privately or by the City, the collection vehicles are sufficiently similar to require the same spatial dimensions for convenient and safe access. Refer to Table 10.3 for the acceptable design parameters.

(c) The vehicular accesses and internal driveways of the development shall be designed to carry the weight of the City's garbage collection vehicles. Construction standards are available from the Solid Waste Management Division.

TABLE 10.1 GARBAGE AND RECYCLING COLLECTION AND STORAGE PRACTICES

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Table 10.1 Part 1
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Table 10.1 Part 2

 

TABLE 10.2 - DESIGN FEATURES OF RESIDENTIAL GARBAGE AND RECYCLING COLLECTION POINTS AND ENCLOSURES

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TABLE 10.2 - DESIGN FEATURES OF RESIDENTIAL GARBAGE AND RECYCLING  COLLECTION POINTS AND ENCLOSURES

 1 A water supply line and hose bib connection adjacent to common pick-up points and common exterior storage enclosures is recommended for ease of maintenance.

2 Gates are not required for exterior storage enclosures for bulk bins when the opening to the storage enclosure is not visually from public property (including public streets) or impact abutting properties or the development. The gates for bulk bin compounds must be open for collection on the morning of the scheduled collection.

TABLE 10.3 - DESIGN FEATURES OF COLLECTION VEHICLE ACCESS DRIVEWAYS

Design Features Design Guidelines
Width 3.7 metres (12 feet) minimum
Surface Material asphalt or other approved hard surface
Turning Radius

12 metre centreline (40 feet) minimum for bagged garbage collection and blue box recycling

12 metre centreline (40 feet) for bulk bin garbage collection three point or hammerhead type turning facilities that require reversing are not generally acceptable.

Location of housing units on private drives for individual collection Housing units must have designated parking in front of each unit with no common parking lot.

12. GRADING AND DISPOSAL OF STORM, SURFACE AND WASTE WATER

12.1. Objectives

The objectives of proper grading and disposal of storm, surface and waste waters are to optimize:

  1.  safe convenient and functional access for pedestrians and vehicles to all areas of the site;
  2.  preservation of the natural features of the site where feasible;
  3.  balanced cut and fill;
  4.  proper site drainage such that storm water is generally contained within the site and directed to an internal storm drainage system, thereby generally preventing drainage onto adjacent properties;
  5. the prevention of storm water from entering sanitary sewer system by any means, including weeping tiles;
  6.  where subdivisions have been designed with overland flow routes across a number of block/lots, the grading designs will accommodate and maintain these flows across the blocks/lots;
  7.  use of infiltration systems;
  8.  recharging ground water; where possible; and
  9.  implement permanent private storm systems;

(See Council Policies on dry wells, weeping tile, subsurface drainage, the Drainage By-law, PPS’s and Official Plan Policy 17.6.2, 17.6.3, 17.6.4, 17.6.5).

12.2. Grading Specifications

Area of Site Grades

(a) Area Immediately Adjacent To Building

(i) - unpaved 2% minimum

(ii) - paved 5.8% max. (1% min. for drainage)

(b) Landscaped Areas 1

(i) - turfed or sodded 33% max. (2% min. for drainage)

(ii) - planting areas and private yards 5% maximum

(c) Parking Areas 3% maximum

(d) Internal Driveways 2 5% maximum

(e) Access Driveways 3 2% maximum

(f) Bicycle-Pedestrian Ways 10% maximum

(g) Barrier free pathways 8% maximum

1 See Part 9 "Landscaping" for further details.

2 Internal driveway grades may exceed 5% in order to maintain topographic amenities.

3 Refers to portion of Internal Driveways that are 6 m (20 feet) into site measured from the street line, as widened.

12.3. Storm Retention Systems

(a) The flows from a site being developed are to be restricted to those flows which were allowed for the site in the design of the receiving storm sewer.

(b) If, in the opinion of the City Engineer, a storm water retention system is required as a method of temporary on-site storage of storm water, then the developer will be required to have a professional engineer submit to and have approved by the City Engineer the design of a storm water retention system. The approved method is to be displayed on the site plan submitted for site plan approval.

(c) Upon completion of construction the developer will be required to have the professional engineer certify that the retention system was constructed in accordance with the approved design.

(d) In certain circumstances, a separate application and fee for an Environmental Certificate of Approval (ECA) is required from the Ministry of the Environment.

(e) Site plan approval cannot be granted until the ECA has been received.

12.4. Dry Well Storm Water Disposal Systems

(a) If no storm sewer is available or if a storm sewer cannot be extended, the City Engineer will consider the use of a dry well system as an interim method of storm water disposal. The following will then apply:

(i) The developer will be required to have a professional geotechnical engineer conduct soils tests to determine if the soils are suitable for a dry well system.

(ii) If existing soils are suitable, the geotechnical engineer will be required to submit to and have approved by the City Engineer the design of a dry well system. The following criteria is to be included in the design:

- a drain, adequately sized and graded, extending from the dry well system to the street line, for future connection to a storm sewer (unless this requirement is specifically waived by the City Engineer);

- roof water flows being directed to the dry well system;

- dry wells being located at such distances from buildings as is required to prevent seepage to the weeping tile system and sanitary sewer system.

(iii) If existing soils are unsuitable for a dry well system, then the design is to include such measures as will be required to provide a functional storm water disposal system, failing which, site plan approval will not be given.

(iv) A separate application and fee for an Environmental Certificate of Approval (ECA) is required.

(b) The site services plan submitted for site plan approval is to display all relevant dry well design criteria.

(c) Upon completion of construction, the Developer will be required to have the geotechnical engineer certify that all work was carried out in accordance with the approved design.

12.5. Roof Water Leaders

(a) The flows from all roof water leaders are to be directed to the internal storm drainage system.

(b) For conversions of existing buildings, the following will apply, when connections are found to the sanitary sewer system:

(i) down spouts are to be disconnected above ground level; and

(ii) the remaining portions of downspouts below ground level are to be sealed off with concrete.

(c) Separation of existing internal combined storm and sanitary drains may be required, as requested by the City Engineer.

12.6. Sampling Manholes

Sanitary flows, other than domestic sewage and storm flows containing effluents, such as cooling water require special provisions, including sampling manholes for monitoring by the City.

Any such manholes shall be displayed specifically on the site plan and shall be located on the private drain connection(s) within the development site at the street line.

12.7. Abandoned Private Drain Connections

Private drains which are to be abandoned are to be shown on the site servicing plan. Drains will be excavated at the street line, inspected and sealed to the satisfaction of the City Engineer.

12.8. Existing Private Drain Connections

Any existing private drain connections are to be shown on the site servicing plan. If it is proposed that they be re-used in connection with the proposed development, they are to be excavated at the street line and approved for such use only if they are found to be acceptable to the City Engineer after inspection of same.

12.9. New Private Drain Connections

The developer is responsible for the construction of new private drain connections. The contractor must first obtain a Permit for Approved Works from the Development & Compliance Services. The new private drain connection is to be shown on the site plan.

12.10. Sewer Rental Charges

The developer may be subjected to a sewer rental charge, in accordance with the Sewer Rental By-law. Details are available from the Engineering & Environmental Services.

12.11 Grading Certificates

(a) Plans showing grading of the property shall be accompanied by:

  1.  in the case of land in respect of which an accepted area or subdivision grading plan has been filed with the City Engineer, a lot grading plan bearing the signature and seal of the subdivision owner’s professional engineer who is responsible for the overall subdivision grading certifying thereon that the lot grading of the land generally conforms with the accepted subdivision grading plan filed with the City Engineer;
  2.  in the case of land in respect of which no accepted subdivision grading plan has been filed with the City Engineer, a lot grading plan bearing the signature and seal of a profession engineer, or a Landscape Architect who is a member of the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects, or an Ontario Land Surveyor who certifies thereon that the drainage scheme depicted by the plan will be compatible with the existing drainage patterns.

(b) Shall provide a final lot grading certificate within seven (7) months of occupancy of the building,

(i) bearing the signature and seal of the subdivision owner’s professional engineer certifying that the finished elevations and grading of the land generally confirms with the accepted area or subdivision grading plans and the lot grading plan specified in clauses 12.11(a)(i) and (ii) of this By-law; or

(ii) where no accepted area or subdivision grading plan exists, bearing the signature and seal of a professional engineer, or a Landscape Architect who is a member of the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects, or an Ontario Land Survey certifying that the finished elevations and grading of the land generally conforms to the lot grading plan specified in clauses 12.11(a)(i) and (ii) of this By-law.

(c) The Owner is required to provide a lot grading and drainage plan that includes, but is not limited to, minor, major storm/drainage flows that are generally contained within the subject site boundaries and safely conveys all minor and major flows up to the 250 year storm event that is stamped by a Professional Engineer, all to the satisfaction of the City Engineer.

(d) The Owner and their Consulting Professional Engineer shall ensure the storm/drainage conveyance from the existing external drainage through the subject lands are preserved, all to the satisfaction of the City Engineer.”

13. TREE PRESERVATION

13.1 Objective

(a) To retain existing vegetation suitable for preservation through careful site planning including the consideration of building, site facility and site servicing locations.

(b) To enhance environmental quality such as maintaining the scenic qualities of streets and neighbourhoods, screening undesirable views, providing separation between land uses, stabilizing slopes, reducing soil erosion, providing habitat for wildlife, modifying air temperatures and providing wind and sun protection.

(c) To enhance the economic value of properties by reduced landscaping cost and increased property by maximizing the extents of trees preservation values.

13.2 Existing Vegetation - Definition

All existing vegetation as defined by the following criteria shall be shown on the existing conditions plan submitted with an application for site plan approval:

(a) trees exceeding 100 mm (4 inches) diameter at breast height in the interior of the site and on abutting properties within 3 meters of a property line and;

(b) shrubs exceeding 1.5 metres (5 feet) in height located:

(i) on both sides of a property line of the proposed development;

(ii) on the proposed development and within 6 metres (19.6 feet) of a property line including a property line common to a public street; and

(iii) on lands adjacent to the proposed development and within 1.5 metres (5 feet) of the common property line; and

(c) trees and shrubs on the boulevard of the public street along the streetline(s) of the proposed development.

If there is no existing vegetation as defined in this section within the proposed development a statement by the Owner or Owner's representative is required on the existing conditions plan. The statement should be dated and signed by the Owner or Owner's representative and refer to the date of the site inspection at which time no existing vegetation was located on the site. The existing conditions plan showing the location and general description of existing vegetation or a statement by the Owner or Owner's representative is a requirement at the time of site plan application and a prerequisite to the acceptance and processing of an application.

Exemptions: Minor or small scale development such as building additions, changes of use, outdoor patios, temporary structures, or small parking/loading area expansions upon lands that have been previously landscaped and where the development will have no substantial impact upon the existing landscape.

(d) It is also recognized that while smaller trees and understorey plant materials do not need to be located as aprt of the inventory. It is equally important that these materials be considered for preservation when in combination with trees and shrubs notes above in 13.2(a) & (b)

13.3 Tree Preservation Report

A tree preservation report shall be provided for proposed development on lands where there is existing vegetation. Tree preservation reports must be prepared by a qualified consultant; usually an urban forester, arborist, or landscape architect. Depending upon factors such as the amount, location, condition (state of health), quality with regard to species, significance or sensitivity of the existing vegetation, the extent of the tree preservation report may vary from the simplest form such as notes on the landscape plan or a letter report to more extensive reports that may include detailed tree inventories, assessments, discussion of alternatives and multiple recommendations. Any recommendations should also be based on the review of the grading and servicing plans for the development. Owners shall preserve as many trees as practically possible The report shall include the following:

  1. (a) a plan prepared by an Ontario Land Surveyor or other accepted professional at the same scale as the site plan and a reduction of the same be submitted for review and approval and preferably using the site services plan as a base showing,
    1. accurate location of existing vegetation;
    2.  existing and proposed grade elevations;
    3.  building, site facilities including parking areas, driveways, service areas, and pedestrian walkways, and underground and overhead services; and
    4.  limits of construction/ground disturbance.
  2.  a general description or detailed inventory (depending upon the extent of the report) of the existing vegetation. Such description shall also include species, size, location, health, age, rare or threatened species.
  3.  an opinion of the significance of the vegetation.
  4.  an evaluation of the impact of the proposed development upon the existing vegetation.
  5.  possible site layout and/or site servicing modifications recommended to reduce the impact of the proposed development upon existing vegetation.
  6.  recommended vegetation to be preserved.
  7. ) measures to mitigate the impact of the proposed construction upon vegetation recommended for preservation including the care of trees during and after construction including items such as watering, fertilizing, aerating, pruning as my be required to ensure the preservation of the trees.
  8.  provisions for replacement of trees recommended for preservation. The requirement of a Tree Preservation Report or element(s) of the report may be exempted in circumstances such as:
    1.  the conflict between the location of existing vegetation and the reasonable development of the site is unavoidable;
    2.  the existing vegetation is proposed to be preserved by the developer and can be isolated from the impacts of the development. An example of this exemption would be a group of trees located at a remote corner of a site or along a property line that can be protected for preservation by construction of temporary protective fencing;
    3.  the existing vegetation is considered an unsuitable species;
    4.  survivability of the existing vegetation is obviously not feasible;
    5.  the existing vegetation is protected by other authority or agreement such as its location within the flood plain or an approved plan of subdivision; and
    6.  the existing vegetation has been included in a previous report provided by the Developer and accepted by the City.
    7.  to demonstrate that any construction on the subject site will not affect any palnt material on abutting lands.

13.4 Prior to Construction

Prior to issuance of a building permit or construction on the site, the owners qualified consultant will be required to:

  1.  review drawings submitted for building permit approval and certify that the recommendations of the Tree Preservation Report have been incorporated in the building permit application drawings and that the permit application including the proposed grading, drainage and site servicing is not in conflict with the vegetation proposed for preservation. The consultants review of potential conflicts with proposed site services shall include gas, electrical, telephone and cable utilities. Exemption from this requirement may be provided if the building permit plans are of a simple and straight forward nature and City staff can easily confirm the effectiveness of the proposed measures for tree preservation.
  2.  verify that any recommendations of the approved Tree Preservation Report required prior to construction or issuance of a building permit such as the installation of protective fencing, selective tree removal or pruning have been completed as required in accordance with the accepted recommendations.
  3.  the Owner’s qualified consultant will certify to the City that all tree preservation protection fencing has been installed and will provide periodic inspections to ensure it has been maintained in accordance with the preservation plan.

13.5 Project Completion

Upon completion of construction and prior to the release of final performance security or final acceptance by the city, the Owner's qualified consultant will be required to certify that work has been completed substantially in accordance with the recommendations of the approved tree preservation report. Exemption to this requirement may be provided if compliance can be confirmed by City Staff at the time of construction completion. An example of this exception would be the installation and removal of temporary protective fencing with no disturbance of the trees designated for preservation including the understory plaintings.

13.6 Maintenance

Existing trees that have been preserved for the purpose of fulfilling a requirement of Section 9 Landscaping and Buffering of the Site such as; screening, buffer strips, or parking lot landscaping will be shown on the landscape plan and maintained and/or replaced as required in the same manner as landscape material provided at the time of development. Replacement of other vegetation preserved to contribute to the aesthetic or ornamental quality of the development will not be required.

13.7 Reduced Landscaping Requirements

Landscaping requirements for a property may be reduced to reflect the value of the preserved vegetation in contributing to the landscaping of the site. Requirements may be reduced such as:

  1. reduced installation size of "new" plant material by up to 50%;
  2.  seeding of low intensity use areas;
  3. reduction of "new" trees required equal to those preserved provided the preserved trees are in a similar location and fulfill the same functional requirement as those required for landscape plan approval;
  4.  reduction of ornamental or non-functional landscaping by up to 100%; and
  5.  elimination of perimeter fencing where existing vegetation provides an adequate barrier.

13.8 Approval Procedures

(Refer to Appendix 2), Site Plan Approval and Enforcement Procedures) To ensure that site plan approval applications are not delayed and to incorporate the most efficient and cost effective tree preservation measures the consideration of existing vegetation should take place as early as possible in the site planning process.

At the time of Site Plan Approval or Building Permit application, the existing conditions site plan should include:

  1. the location and description of existing vegetation as defined in Part 13.2 of this section, or
  2.  a signed statement by the Owner or Owner's representative declaring that there is no existing vegetation on the site as defined in Part 13.2 of this section, or
  3.  a request to be exempt from the requirement to show existing vegetation. Applications that include existing vegetation will be reviewed with regard to the need for a Tree Preservation Report and at the time of application acceptance, the Owner or Owner's representative will be advised of either a requirement for a Tree Preservation Report or exemption from the requirement. If a Tree Preservation Report is required, it must be submitted prior to consideration of the application by the Site Plan Review Group. Consideration by the Site Plan Review Group will be deferred on a one week basis until the Tree Preservation Report is received. Final site plan approval is subject to the approval of the Tree Preservation Report.

14. BICYCLE PARKING FACILITIES

(a) Objectives:

To encourage the use of bicycles as an alternative means of transportation, bicycle parking facilities shall be provided at the residential base and at destination locations such as the workplace, convenience and destination and commercial and institutional facilities. Bicycle parking shall be provided in facilities that are convenient, safe, secure and functional for the intended use.

(b) Number of Bicycle Parking Spaces:

To be provided in accordance with the regulations set out in the current Zoning By-law.

(c) Design Characteristics

When required in association with a development, bicycle parking spaces

shall be provided in accordance with the design characteristics as set out in Table 6.10.

(d) Long and Short-term Bicycle Parking Facilities:

Long-term bicycle parking is required for apartment buildings and lodging houses with five or more residential units to store bicycles for several hours or days at a time. The facility must be protected from the weather and should be enclosed within a secure space.

Subject to the provisions of the Z.-1 Zoning By-law, short-term bicycle parking is required for all non-residential development requiring 10 or more vehicular parking spaces. Short-term bicycle parking spaces should be as accessible as possible and should be visible to discourage theft. Short-term bicycle parking facilities typically consist of a rack or a post where the frame and wheels of the bicycle can be secured by a user supplied lock.

Table (14.1) Design Characteristics for Bicycle Parking Facilities

Location

Long-Term Bicycle Parking:

Apartment buildings and lodging houses (with five or more residential units) shall be required to provide for long-term bicycle parking opportunities in an accessible, secure and weather protected area. Subject to the design characteristics set out below, long-term bicycle parking spaces may be provided in the following locations;

  1.  in a bicycle room or bicycle compound located within a building or motor vehicle parking structure
  2.  within an individual bicycle locker
  3.  within an accessory building

For the purpose of this By-law, long-term bicycle parking shall not be provided within a dwelling unit or a balcony thereof.

Short-Term Bicycle Parking:

Short-term bicycle parking spaces may be provided within an exterior space (covered or uncovered) designated for the parking of bicycles. Large scale developments may spatially disperse the required number of short-term bicycle parking spaces throughout the site in accordance with the locational considerations detailed under 4, 5, 6, and 7 noted below.

Size of a Bicycle Parking Space Minimum horizontal dimensions of 0.6 metres by 1.5 metres and a height of at least 1.9 metres
Aisle Width Where more than one row of bicycle parking spaces is provided, a minimum aisle width of 1.5 metres shall be provided.
Location for Accessibility
  • Less than 15 metres from the entrance used by cyclists or if located within a building in a location easily accessible to bicycles
  • Should not be farther from the entrance than the closest motor vehicle parking space (excluding parking spaces for the person with disabiltities)
  • In a separately designated area that does not impede the movement of pedestrians
  • In an easy to find location directly visible from the street and if not directly visible from the street directional information signs shall be installed to direct cyclists to the bicycle parking facility
Location for Natural Surveillance
  • Located within constant visual range of persons within the adjacent building or within well traveled pedestrian areas
  • Within unobstructed view from the adjacent municipal roadway
Security Lighting
  • Night lighting shall be provided in a manner to ensure that the entire bicycle parking area is well lit
Covered Bicycle Parking
  • If covered motor vehicle parking is provided, the required bicycle parking shall also be covered.

(e) Change Room and Shower Facilities: Change room and shower facilities for cyclists are encouraged to enhance the use of bicycles for work based travel.

Section 15 WATER SERVICES

15.1 Existing Water Services

Any existing water services are to be shown on the site servicing plan. An existing water service is not permitted to be reused where an existing building is to be demolished and replaced by a new building. In this case, the water service is to be abandoned by disconnecting the water service at the main, in accordance with the City of London Requirements. An existing water service can continue to be used where the development does not involve demolition of the existing building. The owner’s engineering consultant should verify the capacity required for the proposed use in order to determine whether the existing service is adequate or not Owners should exercise caution when reusing an existing water service and should verify its condition prior to constructing new surface works on top of it.

15.2 New Water Services

New Water services are to be shown on the site servicing plan. Water services shall not be taken from transmission mains 600 mm (24”) in diameter and larger where an alternate source is available. If the results of hydrant flow tests are to be used in the design of fire sprinkler systems or domestic water supply, the Water Engineering or Water Operations Divisions should be consulted to confirm available pressures and flows at the watermain under the design conditions of the water distribution system. Adjustments should be made since flow tests are not usually done at design conditions. Designers should also be aware of losses/pressure drops in the private water systems due to the use of backflow prevention devices or friction losses in the service.

The designer shall consider water quality in the design of the private water servicing. Where there is a potential for an adverse impact to the City of London water distribution system from a private water system, the City of London reserves the right to require isolation of the site from the municipal water supply system. This will involve construction of appropriate backflow prevention devices immediately inside the property line at the owner’s cost. This may be above and beyond the requirements of the Ontario Building Code which addresses backflow requirements for the building.

15.3 Fire Flow Calculations

The consultant shall indicate whether fire protection is being provided by hydrants located within the municipal right of way, or by servicing on site. Where fire protection is to be provided by on site servicing (fire sprinkler system or private hydrants), fire flow calculations are to be included in the submission for site plan approval. This should include assessment of the impact of backflow preventers, which are required on fire sprinkler systems, and may have significant headlosses. The designer is advised to obtain information for the device proposed for use in order to confirm that adequate pressures and flows will be available.

15.4 Plan Drawings of Water Servicing on Private property

Site servicing drawings indicating onsite water servicing are to be included with all applications. The drawings shall indicate the connection to the municipal system, the size of the watermain and the location and routing of the private water main, valving, locations of water meters, hydrants, fire sprinkler systems, and backflow preventers and all other information required to meet the City of London standards.The drawings should also indicate fire flow and domestic water demand requirements.

15.5 Domestic Water Demand

The designer shall indicate domestic water demand for the site. This, together with the layout and sizing of the watermain is needed to confirm water quality and is also needed to size the water meter properly. This shall be provided for all buildings except single detached dwellings, semi-detached dwellings and duplex dwellings that are directly serviced from a public street.

15.6 Calculation for Water Quality based on Domestic Demand

The water system design shall be confirmation that there will be no water quality issues resulting from the new system being proposed. As such, it is a requirement to provide water quality analysis for all sites with the exception of single detached dwellings, semi-detached dwellings and duplex dwellings that are serviced directly from a public street. Where applicable, these water quality calculations are required for complete application for site plan approval so that the appropriate staff can review the calculations. If this is missing, the application may not be considered complete.

15.7 Water Meter Sizing

Water meter sizes shall be determined based on flows. The sizing of the water meter may vary significantly from the service size. The designer shall provide information with the application which addresses any flows that go through the meter including domestic flows and fire flows, if applicable, for review of meter sizing by the City of London Water Meter Department. This is applicable for all buildings except single detached dwellings, semi-detached dwellings and duplex dwellings that are directly serviced from a public street.

15.8 Lead Time to Ensure Larger Size Meters are in Stock

The City of London Water Meter Department stocks smaller sized meters which are used frequently. However water meters which are 75 mm (3”) in size or greater are typically a special order item. Allow for a lead time of up to eight weeks.

15.9 Conflicting Designs for Water Service Size and Location

Where applicable, the design of site services shall be coordinated with the building plumbing design in an effort to reduce re-submissions and conflicts. The building plumbing design and site plan design should agree on the location and size of the water service.

15.10 Abandoned Water Services

Water services which are to be abandoned are to be shown on the site servicing plan. Water services are to be disconnected at the watermain to the satisfaction of the City Engineer

Schedule 2

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Schedule 2 Part 1
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Schedule B Part 2
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Schedule B Part 3
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Schedule B Part 4
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Schedule B Part 5

 

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Schedule B Part 6
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Schedule B Part 6
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Schedule B Part 7
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Schedule B Part 8

Description of Schedules

Schedule "A"

Title: Legal Description

Schedule “B” Page 1 of 1

Drawing Title: Site Plan

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “C” Page 1 of 2

Drawing Title: Site Servicing Plan

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “C” Page 2 of 2

Drawing Title: Site Engineering Details

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “D” Page 1 of 4

Drawing Title: North Elevation

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “D” Page 2 of 4

Drawing Title: South Elevation

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “D” Page 3 of 4

Drawing Title: East Elevation

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “D” Page 4 of 4

Drawing Title: West Elevation Page

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “E” Page 1 of 2

Drawing Title: Landscape Plan

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule “E” Page 2 of 2

Drawing Title: Landscape Details

Drawing Author:

Drawing Number:

Date of Drawing:

Drawing Latest Revision Date:

Items Amended by Hand:

Date Amended by Hand:

Municipal Address:

Drawing Sealed by:

City File Number:

Schedule F

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Schedule F

Schedule G

Lot and Block Grading Restrictions

The Transferee covenants with the Transferor to observe and comply with the following lot and block grading restrictions, the burden which shall run with these Lands. This covenant shall be binding upon and ensure to the benefit of the respective heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns of the parties.

(i) Obligation to Grade According to Accepted Plan: These lands shall not be graded except in general conformity with the grades and elevations shown on the approved site servicing plan attached to the development agreement or filled with the City Engineer of the City of London.

(ii) Certified Lot Grading Plan: No building shall be constructed on these lands until a Certified Lot Grading Plan has been filed with the Chief Building Official of the City of London showing:

the proposed finished elevation of these lands at each corner of the lot or block;

the proposed finished elevation of these lands at the front of and rear of the building:

the proposed finished elevations of the underside of the footings and the proposed finished height of the foundation of the building;

the proposed finished elevation of any retaining walls, the proposed elevation of any walk-out onto these lands from the basement of the building, and the proposed elevation fo any basement window openings;

the proposed finished elevation and slope of any driveway and the proposed location of any swale or rear yard catch basin; and,

any abrupt changes in the proposed finished elevation of these lands.

The plan shall bear the signature and seal of an Ontario Professional Engineer who certifies thereon that the Plan generally conforms with the approved site servicing plan attached to the development agreement or filed with the City Engineer.

(iii) Owner’s Interim Grading Certificate: No building shall be constructed beyond the readiness to construct structural framing until has been filed with the CBO an Owner’s Interim Grading Certificate bearing the signature and seal of either an Ontario Professional Engineer or an Ontario Land Surveyor that the elevations and footings or the foundations generally conform with the Certified Lot Grading Plan.

(iv) Owner’s Final Grading Certificate: No newly constructed building shall be occupied or used unless there is filed with the CBO an Owner’s Final Grading Certificate bearing the signature and seal of an Ontario Professional Engineer that the actual finished elevation and grading of these lands generally conform with the approved site servicing plan and the Certified Lot Grading Plan, either:

a) prior to occupancy , in the case of substantial completion on or between June 1 and October 31, or

b) by the following June 1, in the case of substantial completion on or between November 1, and May 31:

Schedule 3

to By-law No. C.P.-1455-541

List of appointed officers of the Corporation identified by position occupied to whom Council's powers or authority under Section 41 of the Act have been delegated.

Managing Director, Development and Compliance Services and Chief Building Official;

Director, Development Services;

Manager, Development Planning;

Manager, Development Services (Site Plans);

 

As Amended by
By-Law No. Date Passed at Council
C.P.-1455-541 June 26, 2006
C.P.-1455(a)-590 July 24, 2006
C.P.-1455(b)-344 October 21, 2008
C.P.-1455(c)-56 February 2, 2009
C.P.-1455(d)-299 November 15, 2010
C.P.-1455(e)-16 December 20, 2010
C.P.-1455(f)-78 February 28, 2011
C.P.-1455(g)-237 August 30, 2011
C.P.-1455(h)-278 September 19, 2011
C.P.-1455(i)-153 May 1, 2012
C.P.-1455(j)-166 May 14, 2013
C.P.-1455(j)-303 September 2, 2014
C.P.-1455(k)-356 October 14, 2014
C.P.-1455(l)-382 November 25, 2014
C.P.-1455(m)-58 February 9, 2015
C.P.-1455(n)-249 September 15, 2015
C.P.-1455(o)-505 October 17, 2015
C.P.-1455(p)-319 November 26, 2019
Last modified:Wednesday, September 23, 2020